Posted on

kohaku koi different types of kohaku you need to know 2018

types of koi kohaku koi

kohaku koi different types of kohaku you need to know 2018

kohaku koi definition

A koi fish variety that has a white skin and a red pattern is defined as a Kohaku koi.kohaku koi

The kohaku koi is a representative class of the Nishikigoi.

Though its color is plain only white and red.

It reminds all the Japanese of their national flag of Japan.

In the koi world, there is a saying, “Keeping the Nishikigoi begins with the Kohaku and ends with the Kohaku.

First people are attracted by the beauty of the Kohaku koi and charmed by the Showa or the Ogon.

But finally, they go back to the Kohaku koi again.

That means that Kohaku koi is the prototype of the Nishikigoi.

Kohaku koi Origin

It was around 1800 that a red and white koi appeared for the first time.

red and white koi fish

By mutation, a koi with red cheeks called “Hookazuki” was born from a black carp.

Hookazuki koi fish
Hookazuki

Then a white koi was born from “Hookazuki”

white koi
white koi

The white koi being mated with a Higoi, a white koi with Hi markings was breed and called “Hara-aka” (red Belly)”.

white koi higoi or red koi hara aka red belly

Later kois with Hi markings on the gill covers “Era-Hi (Red gills)” were breed.

Era-Hi (Red gills)
Era-Hi (Red gills)

Later than 1830 a “Zu-kinkaburi” whose head is partly red, a “Menkaburi” whose whole head is red.

Zu-kinkaburi
Zu-kinkaburi
Menkaburi
Menkaburi

A “Menkaburi” whose whole head is red, a “Kuchi-beni of which lips are red

Kuchi-beni koi fish
Kuchi-beni

An a “Sarasa” which has red and white markings on the back were breed.

Sarasa kohaku koi fish
Sarasa

In the Meiji era Kohakus spread all over Yamakoshi and were improved.

It was by Gosuke of Utogi that so-called modern Kohaku was breed.

Utogi is a part of Ojiya City now. His real name was Kunizo Hiroi.

He mated a male koi of the cherry blossom pattern with a female which had a redhead.

A Tomouemon inherited Gosuke’s excellent Kohaku and Yagozen and Buheita followed him.

Kohaku Pattern

Good white texture is the most important element in the case of the Kohaku.

It must not be yellowish or brownish but should be snow white.

Dark but bright Hi is Preferable.

There are two kinds of Hi one’s base is purple and the other base is yellowish brown.

The former Hi is darker and does not fade away easily but unrefined.

To learn more about other types of koi click here types of koi

Kohaku
Kohaku is one of the most beautiful koi with its pure white body and intense-red patterns.

The white cannot have a yellow tint, it must be snow-white, and the
Hi (red) must be consistent, evenly colored, without thin, discolored spots. Red is not desirable on the fins.

The edge of the red pattern must be sharp and clear against the white background (this edge is called “kiwa”).

The red pattern should be artistically well-balanced.
One of the most important factors to be considered is the body conformation.

Don’t choose a Kohaku simply because it has a beautiful pattern.

Poor body conformation is usually a result of more serious internal
problems that will eventually result in health problems.

Photos from http://valentinac.com/koi/kohaku.html

Straight Hi Kohaku

kohaku koi Straight Hi Kohaku

Nidan Kohaku

Nidan Kohaku koi

Sandan Kohaku

Sandan Kohaku koi

Yondan Kohaku

Yondan kohaku koi

Godan Kohaku

Godan Kohaku koi

Inazuma Kohaku

Inazuma kohaku koi

Tancho Kohaku

tancho kohaku koi

Kuchibeni Kohaku

Kuchibeni kohaku koi

Menkaburi Kohaku

Menkaburi kohaku koi

Maruten Kohaku

Maruten Kohaku koi

Omoyo Kohaku

Omoyo kohaku koi

Ginrin Kohaku

Ginrin kohaku koi
Kohaku come in hundreds of patterns. Some of the more recognized ones are:

– by patterns on the body:
Omoyo: one step pattern. A continuous, large, unbroken pattern from head to tail.
Straight Hi: Single, continuous Hi pattern, but the red patches are interconnected.
Nidan: two step pattern. Two islands of red color that are not interconnected.
Sandan: three step pattern. (Yondan – four step, Godan – five step, etc.)
Inazuma: pattern resembling a lightning strike; zig-zag pattern.

– by markings on the head:
Tancho: Pure white body with a single roundish red marking on the head between the eyes
(with no other red on the body).
Kuchibeni: red lipstick-like markings, red (beni) on the mouth.
Menkaburi: “hood” pattern – going behind, below the eyes often to the mouth.
Maruten: “crown” on the head pattern – a red mark on the head (similar to Tancho) but with red patterns
on the rest of the body too.

Kohaku are sensitive to water conditions. In hard water they will develop small black freckles (called “shimi”) on the skin.

Softer water will prevent shimi from forming and will also
contribute to the development of the red (beni).

In very young koi the red starts out as a pale yellow and, in time, it changes to orange and later to red.

Males tend to develop the red faster than females, but their color also tends to diminish faster.

Females might take longer to develop the red but their colors will
last longer, this aspect making them more desirable among the hobbyists.

Kohaku There are fundamental points to look for in a kohaku. Pattern for the head, body, the tail, and the fins.

A red marking is indispensable for the head, even if it has beautiful
patterns on the body, a koi without a head Hi will be amoung the first culled.

The ideal shape of the head Hi is a large U spreading over the head,
a head Hi which spreads all over the head is not preferable.

The mouth region should be white, the Hi which spreads down to
the lips, and not covering the cheeks and jaws is also disliked.

The ideal end line of the head Hi is the nose line, and at least down to the eyes.

A head Hi that is neither too large nor too small is preferable.

The head Hi should not spread down to the mouth tip, if it is split in some place, no mouth Hi is acceptable.

The head Hi must not cover the eyes, jaws, and cheeks, but must be as large as possible.

The back should have a pattern well-balanced on both sides. A large mark on the shoulders near the head makes a Kohaku look imposing.

A V shaped white cut on the shoulders is desirable. A continuous pattern from the head to shoulders without any cuts looks dull.

The distance between the last Hi and the tail joint should be about 2cm.

As the fish grows larger, this distance increases, the last Hi spreading
over the tail is disliked, no fins should have Hi.

The skin should be snow white, the Hi deep, each pattern is
different but should show a clean cut edge.

The Kohaku should look imposing, elegant and the pattern well balanced.

The basic factors of Kohaku are, Bright Hi, Sharp pattern edges, no
Hi over the eyes and fins, no Hi markings spreading below the
lateral line, head Hi that does not spread below the nose, and tail Hi that does not spread over the caudal fin.

 

Kohaku Koi are the most popular Koi in Japan. Kohaku, Sanke and Showa Koi are called the “Gosanke” which means “The Three Families.” In the United States, “Gosanke” Koi are often referred to as “The Big Three.”

Kohaku are white bodied koi with red markings (sometimes more orange than red)…

Ideally the white of the body is like fine porcelain in color, with the
red well-demarcated (not “bleeding”). Red is undesirable on the fins,
and unless specified in a particular sub-variety, not below the eyes or on the mouth.

Several “sub-varieties”, designator terms are utilized with Kohaku type koi:

By Hi: “He”, Red Patterns on the Body:

Straight Hi: Pattern like meandering islands of red that are interconnected.

Inazuma: Interconnected red pattern looking “Like a Lightning Bolt”.

Nidan (Ni is two in Japanese): Two Step pattern. Two islands of red color that are not interconnected.

Sandan (San is three in Japanese): Three Step pattern. Three islands of red color that are not interconnected.

Yondan (Yon is four in Japanese): Four Step pattern. Four islands of red color that are not interconnected.

By Red Markings on the Head:

Kuchibeni: “Lipstick”; with red on the oral lobes.

Menkaburi: With “A Hood on the head”. Going behind, below the eyes often to the mouth.

Maruten: With a “Crown on the head”. A reddish mark, though with more red on the body.

Tancho: With a “Red Sun” marking on head, and lacking other red on the body. Best if the “spot” is bright red, w/o bleeding color, and circular, centered on the head.

Koh-haku koi are the cornerstone of any serious koi collection.

They are fairly simple in appearance, with red markings on a white body.

But simplicity aside, this is undeniably the most important and
most fundamental koi variety.

Koh-haku form the root breeding stock of many other varieties,
and they commonly win the “grand champion” award at prestigious koi shows.

KOHAKU

It is said “appreciation of koi starts and ends with Kohaku”. What that means is Kohaku was the first class to be bred consistently or stabilized in about 1890.

It also means that after a person has studied all of the classes of koi and has become experienced, they
will come back to appreciate Kohaku for its simplicity and beauty.

I will keep the amount of Japanese terminology to a minimum in this lecture.

A Japanese term dictionary will be available soon in KOIUSA magazine and on the AKCA website.

Before I continue on Kohaku, I want to take a minute to discuss judging points common to all classes.

Koi are judged as a whole or holistically and are not judged on a positive or negative point system.

Negative points can come into play in close contests.

Koi are judged side by side based on what we see today and not what may be there next week or next year.

Japanese Judges have a disadvantage in often being able to
recognize bloodlines, which can cloud their “judge for today”
decisions because they know which koi cost more and has more potential.

A Japanese Judge once answered a question on why a koi won an
award replying, “because it was the most expensive fish”.

Koi may lose today only to come back to win tomorrow based on the competition tomorrow.

First, the koi cannot be missing anything like a fin or have any
abnormalities like a pushed in mouth all of which will disqualify the koi from judging.

The exception is the second set of barbels.
Second the koi must be healthy and not show signs of disease or
parasites, which could disqualify the koi from judging.

An exception is made for split fins or bruises judged to be caused during transportation.
Third, is the importance of body conformation.

Broad, thick body shape of female koi is preferred giving an
imposing appearance when compared to the thin trout shaped body of a male koi.

Shape and size of the fins are important to be in proportion to the body.

The head shape is important that it not be too short or too long or turn to one side.

The koi when viewed from above should be symmetrical on both sides and not have one side flatter than the other.

Even the way a koi swims is taken into account on conformation.

Not all female koi hold their eggs well, which could affect conformation.

Fourth, in my opinion is quality of skin and deep, vibrant colors, which makes koi “living jewels”.

This also includes how well the koi is “finished”, are all of the colors up, and is there a good sheen on the skin.

It is conformation and quality that will catch a Judges eye from a distance.

Fifth is pattern that is artistically balanced and not front, tail or side heavy.

Pattern must also be proportional to the size of the koi and not have
a small pattern on a huge body or a huge pattern on a small body.

Last is uniqueness or character usually of the pattern on the head that makes this koi special.

Now for Kohaku.

We have a snow white (shiro) base color with a red (hi) pattern. The pattern may be stepped or continuous. The white must be without blemish or yellow tint.

The hi may be any one of the many hues from deep persimmon
orange to Ferrari red but the red must be thick without any thin
spots and the pattern must be the same color from head to tail.

Some Judges prefer the persimmon orange hi to the Ferrari red
because the orange appears soft and the purple red appears hard and gaudy.

Kohaku must have red pattern on the head.
The pattern on the body must be artistically balanced and the kiwa
or rear edges of each spot must be sharp like cut with a razor.

A new bias in Japan has started to favor bloodlines that have the
kiwa stop at the edge of each scale forming a scalloped edge rather
than a straight edge across the center of a scale.

The front edge of each spot (not on the head) may have blurred red color that is called “sashi” or insertion.

Sashi indicates the koi is still improving in quality and is not finished yet.

It is elegant if a Kohaku has a white nose and a white area with no
red pattern just in front of the tail called a “tail stop” and several other names.

Some subtleties of pattern not liked are a totally red head or red
down the face to the nose that are heavy in appearance.

Red pattern wrapping below the lateral line suggests a future koi
when the red and white are better balanced.

Red spots below the lateral line are disliked. The lateral line is a raised sensory organ running the full length of a koi half way up the side of a koi.

A red head pattern with an additional red lip mark is called
“kuchibeni” and can be cute if it balances the overall pattern.

Red pattern at the base of the pectoral fin was considered
unfavorable but is being accepted now if it adds to the overall balance of the pattern.

Red into the tail or into the dorsal fin is still disliked.
Kohaku tend to get black specks “shimis” in hard water with high pH.

Posted on

types of koi The Different Varieties of Koi fish you need to know

koi fishes pictures types of koi

There are fourteen different varieties of Koi, with a fifteenth variety
that is used as a sort of a catchall variety for all of the different
types of koi that do not quite fit into one of the other fourteen slots.

This last variety is known as the Kawarimono, and a large percentage of Koi are placed in this category.

Inclusion in this variety has no bearing on the quality of the Koi.

Placement in the fifteenth variety simply means that there is
something not quite right about the fish.

It may be attractive and healthy, but it does not fit the “breed standard” for any of the individual varieties.

All Koi have a unique beauty, but those who are entered in shows must resemble this standard.

Crossbreeding For Different Varieties

The many different color varieties that you will see were brought to
fruition by crossbreeding fish that are closely related to each other.

Crossbreeding tends to make a genetic line more stable, bringing
out the good qualities while pushing back the bad.

Those who are preparing to be Koi breeders are advised to learn
about the different types of koiv arieties so that they will know
which ones they are interested in breeding and raising.

Asagi

types of koi asagi koi
Photo from hanoverkoifarms.com

The Asagi Koi is one of the initial varieties of Koi. The body of the Asagi is a blue color, with the lighter shades of blue most preferred.

The scales on the skin of the Asagi are given high importance. The edges of these scales must all be equal in length, and must be on the entire body of the koi from its tail to its head.

The red (Hi) color that appears on the sides of the Asagi, on the head, and on the fins sometimes looks more orange than red.

The Hi needs to be symmetrical on both sides of the Koi’s cheeks all the way to its eyes.

Utsurimono

Three varieties of the Utsurimono have been painstakingly developed. These are the –

Ki Utsuri, which is a yellow and black Koi

types of koi ki utsuri
Photo from www.usakoi.com

Hi Utsuri, a red and black Koi

types of koi hi utsuri
Photos from cachepkoi.com.vn

Shiro Utsuri Shiro, a white and black koi

types of koi shiro utsuri
Photo from www.aquariumdomain.com

The Utsurimono should be heavily marked with black (Sumi) in
order to display a prominent contrast with the yellow, red, or white.

All colored need to be somewhat balanced, as this helps to call attention to the pattern on the Koi.

The Utsurimono is sometimes mistaken for the Bekko koi. There are two differences to look for that will allow the observer to tell the two varieties of Koi apart.

The main variation is that the Utsurimono is a black Koi with red,
white, or yellow markings, while the Bekko Koi are either white, yellow, or red Koi that have black markings.

The Utsurimono also feature black markings on their heads that run all the way down to their noses. The Bekko Koi do not have black markings in this area.

Bekko

The Bekko variety is a white, yellow or red Koi that can be identified by the unique black markings.

This assortment has small and very simple black markings that are not included on the head of the Koi.

The Shiro Bekko is white with black markings.
The Aka Bekko is red with black markings
The Ki Bekko is yellow with black markings, and is considered to be rare.

Shusui koi

types of koi shusui koi
Photo from thefishdoctor.co.uk

The Shusui is the result of a crossbreeding that took place in 1910. One Yoshigoro Akiyama crossed an Asagi Koi with a Doitsu Mirror carp.

He ended up with a fish he called the Shusui. The color of this Koi is comparable to that of the Asagi.

The Shusui has a head that is a bluish gray color, with red on the jaws of the Koi.

The skin is a lovely sky blue, with darker fish scales outlining the lateral and dorsal lines.

Lines of red run down the back from the gills to the tail. There are several types of Shusui, including –

Hi Shusui
Hana Shusui
Ki Shusui
Pearl Shusui

Koromo

The Koromo koi is a relatively new type of Koi that appeared around 1950.

The Koromo came into existence by crossing the Kohaku with the Naruni Asagi.

The Koromo has a lovely pattern of deep red edged with black on a white background/body.

The red is described as being in a lace pattern, and the markings of
the Koromo are prone to variations, depending on which variety you are looking at.

The most commonly seen varieties include –

Budo Sanke
Koromo Sanke
Koromo Showa
Budo Goromo
Ai-Goromo
Sumi-Goromo

Goshiki

In Japan, the word “goshiki” means five colors, which are red, white, black, dark blue and blue.

All of these colors can be mixed on the body of one fish. The result of this is a Koi that has a rather purplish tint.

Originally created by crossing the Asgai Koi with the Sanke Koi, the
Goshiki has patterns that are quite striking.

These surprisingly lovely fish are very popular with those who keep Koi as a hobby.

Kawarimono

types of koi fish koi fish image kawarimono

The Kawarimono classification is given to many non-metallic fish
who do not seem to fit in any other variety of Koi.

This classification should in no way be considered as a variety in which to dump the oddly marked Koi! Many gorgeous crossbred Koi come from the Kawarimono variety.

Often, these are not bred on purpose, but appear in a spawning as a “sport” koi.

Generally, the Kawarimono are divided into three groups –

Single-colored Koi
Black Koi
Other colors of Koi

 

kumonryu koi

types of koi kumonryu
Photos from Koiphen.com

Kumonryu. The Kumonryu is a Doitsu (German) koi that has a jet
black pattern that emerges like billowing black clouds against a white background.

 

beni kumonryu koi

types of koi beni kumonryu koi
Photo from http://www.no1koi.com

Beni Kumonryu came from Kumonryu and Doitsu Kohaku. Since Doitsu varieties have no scales, their colors can be very bright and bold.

Beni Kumonryu are a rare form of Kumonryu, they have red along with the black and white.

They are scaless and their pattern actually changes throughout the year.

No one is absolutely sure what causes the color change, but the two
best theories are a change in temperature or a change in pH. Beni Kumonryu are usually black in the winter.

The white and red usually appears in the spring and summer.

 

Chagoi koi

types of koi chagoi koi
Photo from
Helmy Iskandar

The Chagoi is known as the “gentle giant”. They are not the most colorful or fanciest of Koi varieties, but make of for that in other fabulous ways!

Chagoi are the friendliest and most docile Koi breed to the point
that most actually like interaction with people.

In as such they tend to make all of your other fish more friendly and trusting.

They are also known to grow large and grow quickly. They come in
various shades from brown, reddish brown, beige,copper/rootbeer,
and even shades of green. learn more about chagoi at hanoverkoifarms.com

 

Soragoi Koi

types of koi soragoi koi
Photos from
Tuấn Huỳnh Ngọc

Soragoi, similar to Chagoi, are koi of a solid grey or silver color, combined with a subtle net pattern.

Also like Chagoi, mature Soragoi are very docile and will be among the first koi in your pond to learn to hand feed. … Soragoi belong to the Ogon group of koi, which appeared in the Showa Period (1926-1989).

Ochiba-Shigure

Ochiba-Shigure is an interesting name for a Koi. The words translate to mean “dead leaves on the water”.

These fish are clothed in the basic colors of gray and green with a
network of brown lines, rather like the stems of a dead leaf.

Hikarimono (Ogon)

https://youtu.be/9VAZRNMQeSM

The word “Hikari” translates from the Japanese to mean “metallic”.

“Mono” means one particular single color. This means that the ogon koi is classified as a highly metallic-colored variety of Koi. There are –

Metallic silver, or Platinum ogon koi,

Platinun- Ogons are metallic white and are one of the most popular Ogons.

The color should be as white as fresh mountain snow. As with other Ogons

types of koi platinum ogon
Photo from http://cacanhthaihoa.com

Metallic yellow, or Yamabuki ogon koi.

types of koi yamabuki ogon
photo from http://splendorkoi.com

These two colors are the most common, and the easiest shades of ogon koi to purchase.

There is also the –

Fuji ogon koi, where only the head of the Koi is metallic
Orenji ogon koi, which is all orange like a common goldfish, with a red splotch on its back. Goldfish lovers are usually quite fond og the Orenji.

Except for the Fuji, the metallic color of the ogon koi must
be the same from the head to the tail, and even flow down to the ends of each fin to be considered “correct”.

The size of the fins also matters a great deal. Everyone wants to see long fins on the ogon koi, as they help to counterbalance the plain Koi body.

Ogon koi are a single solid colour with a metallic appearance. This variety is very popular, particularly with those new to keeping koi.

These fish can be a variety of attractive colours. Cream specimens
are rare and the most popular choices are bright yellow (Yamabuki
ogon koi) and Platinum (Purachina ogon koi).

Hikarimoyo-mono

kio fish pictures hikarimoyo

Any Koi that are metallic and have several colors, but do not come from Utsuri lineage are in this group.

The Hikarimoyo-mono was created by crossing a Platinum Ogon
with several other varieties, none of which had any Utsuri genes at all. This cross resulted in the

  • Gin Bekko
  • Kujaku koi

types of koi kujako koi
Photo from masterfisch.co.uk

The Kujaku is a metallic or Ogon koi with the reticulated net-like pattern of the Asagi on its back. …

The development of high quality Kujaku has led to their being
judged in a category of their own at recent koi shows.

Kujaku are koi with a solid white base, accented by a black net pattern along with patterns of red/orange/yellow.

The net pattern is created by a black edging on each individual scale.

Variations of Kujaku include Doitsu Kujaku, Tancho Kujaku and Maruten Kujaku.

There is another group in this classification, which has fish of two
colors, either gold, orange, or platinum.

These Koi are called Hariwake. The Orenji Hariwake and the Hariwake matsuba koi are two examples of this variety.

Hariwake koi

types of koi hariwake koi
Photo from http://www.koiphen.com

types of koi matsuba koi
Photo from hanoverkoifarms.com

The matsuba koi is basically an Ogon with reticulation. It is a one colored metallic koi with dark pigment on the scales.

This variety is in the Hikari Muji class, and is considered one color
regardless of the contrasting scales.

KIN matsuba koi are orange-red metallic skin, GIN matsuba koi are platinum based.

kikusui koi

types of koi kikusui koi
Photo from Koi des Tages

Kikusui – Kikusui. Although technically they are the Doitsu version
of Hariwake, scaleless white koi with patterns of orange or yellow

goshiki koi

 

goshiki koi pronounced (gosh-key or Go-she-key by some) are an interesting breed of Koi. The name means ‘five colors” in Japanese, but frankly it is not a fitting name in my opinion with today’s goshiki koi. You do not readily see five colors at a glance and it is a stretch to do so no matter. This is one breed I feel the Japanese creators misnamed.

Most times the Japanese names are right on the money as for
descriptive names that tell a story of what the Koi breed looks like.

The name was probably created because of the look of some of the
first goshiki koi  created when they crossed a Sanke to and Asagi. Today yet I don’t see the “:five colors) easily. Anyway, enough about that.

The goshiki koi basically a white based Koi that has a fishnet black
pattern on top of the white base that covers the entire back and
runs from the top of the back down to the lateral line (center line of
the side of the fish that runs from gill plate to tail base).

On top of the fishnet pattern there is a red or orange pattern like the Kohaku.

This pattern is called the Hi (hee) plate. One difference in this Hi
plate from Goshiki to Kohaku is that the Goshiki Hi tends to be
much thicker, bolder and more neon in color intensity as
compared to the Kohaku Hi plate which can be a glossy red/orange but not neon.

The Goshiki Hi plate actually glows and gives the impression of
thickness to the point that the Hi plate can look like a sticker stuck on top of the fishes fishnet pattern.

There are also offshoot breeds from Goshiki called Goshiki Sanke and Goshiki Showa. We won’t get into those details now though.

The term peacock koi refers to the five colors on the body of the koi.

The base color of this variety is white and the fins are generally white and free of any pigment.

The pattern markings on Goshiki are red, or Hi. … Kloubec Koi Farm is a breeder of Japanese Goshiki variety koi.

Kohaku

types of koi kohaku koi

The Kohaku is a White koi with red, or Hi markings. The color white should look as if it is freshly fallen snow,

and there should be no superfluous marks on the white to distract the eye from the pristine color.

The clarity between the Hi color and the white is called the Kiwa.

The pattern on the Kohaku should have depth and should be as well balanced as possible.

There are several different pattern types, including the –

  • Inazuma, which means lightning strike in Japanese.
  • Nidan is the name for two red or Hi markings on the white background of the fish.
  • Sandan is the name for three red or Hi markings on the white fish.
  • Yondan is the name for four red or Hi markings on the Kohaku.
  • learn more about kohaku koi click here https://www.giobelkoicenter.com/kohaku-koi/

 

Taisho Sanke

types of koi kio fish pictures sanke

The Taisho Sanke is a Koi carp with three different colors. In this instance, the colors are red, or Hi, black, or Sumi, and white.

The color depth and the balance of the pattern on the fish is important, just as it is on the Kohaku.

The Taisho Sanke should not have any black (sumi) on the head.

Black (Sumi) is welcome on the fins, and most particularly on the pectoral and the caudal fins. T

his is taken as a sign that the Sumi color should stay even over the entire body of the fish.

The red (Hi) patterns may be on just a part of the body, or can extend back over the entire length of the body.

Showa Sanshoku

koifish pictures showa

The Showa Sanshoku Koi has much more black (Sumi) included in its patterns than does the Taisho Sanke.

In fact, this classification is mostly black with a foreground of red and white markings.

Color depth is very important in this variety. The black (Sumi)should be deep and dark, the color of an object made of the dense and dark black wood known as ebony.

The red (Hi) markings need to be a blood red color, and the white
should be as crisp and clean in appearance as a freshly washed and starched white shirt.

The white color on the Showa Sanshoku should be even and uniform on the base of the pectoral fins.

There are several different varieties of the Showa Sanshoku that can
pop up in other Koi classifications, such as the –

Koromo
Kawarimono (Kage Showa, Kankoko Showa)
Hikari-Utsurimono (Kin Showa)
Tancho Showa

What is a Chagoi koi?

Chagoi Koi – Mr. Personality (Chah’-goy) … You’ll discover this pet is probably more intelligent than other koi in your pond too.

It is almost universally agreed to be the friendliest of the koi
classifications because it is the most aggressive at feeding time and
almost always the first fish to become hand-tame

The Cha-goi is a part of the catchall class known as Kawarimono. “Cha” is the word for a tea-colored Koi that is a very fast grower.

The Cha-goi is very easy to tame, and most people thoroughly enjoy having this variety in their pond.

How many types of koi are there?

Types of Koi Varieties. There are over a 100 different types of koi (Nishikigoi).

To find the proper koi classification you will need to look at their
colors, patterns, and body confirmation.

Each type of koi fish variety has it’s own specific details for
identification and can described based off another classification of Japanese Koi type.

For example, a Showa Sanke is a koi with calligraphic Sumi pattern
on Kohaku and the Goshiki created by breeding Asagi with Kohaku. View popular koi varieties below and click to learn about each type of koi.

What type of fish is a butterfly koi?

https://youtu.be/5m_YzQ3CMXI

Butterfly koi, longfin koi, or dragon carp are a type of ornamental
fish notable for their elongated finnage.

The fish are a breed of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio, which
includes many wild carp races as well as domesticated koi (“Nishikigoi”). … They are also sometimes referred to as Dragon Koi.

Onagaoi

Also known as American koi, Butterfly koi, Longfin koi, and Dragon
koi, the Onagaoi has beautiful long fins reminiscent of a butterfly’s wings.

The Japanese bred these koi, hoping to improve the hardiness of all koi by doing so.

A type of wild fish called Indonesian Longfin river carp were
captured by these breeders to use in breeding experiments.

These carp were bred with koi that were more traditional in appearance.

The fish that resulted from this breeding had the long fins and the resiliency that hoped for.

Koi Purists Dislike the Butterfly

Other breeding experiments carried out in the hopes of
setting the different patterns of traditional koi onto the long finned.

This attempt at crossbreeding was mostly successful. Many koi purists are adamantly against the Onagaoi.

This is the reason why many of the people who sell koi do not offer this variety.

Famous breeders in Japan would not think of breeding the Onagaoi.

These koi are not popular anywhere in the world except for the United States.

What is a ghost koi?

types of koi ghost koi fish

Ghost Koi. … The Ghost Koi that surfaced in the early ’80s are a hybrid mix of wild carp and single-colored metallic Ogon koi.

They are also referred to as Ghost Carp—one of the reasons that
koi purists don’t recognize them as true Nishikigoi at all.

Tancho koi

types of koi tancho koi
Photo and description from simikoi.com

Koi with a red head patch are called “Tancho.” Most common are
“Tancho Kohaku (all-white Koi with Tancho),” “Tancho Sanshoku
(white Koi with Sumi similar to Shiro Bekko, and with Tancho),” and
“Tancho Showa (Showa Sanshoku without red markings except for
Tancho),” etc. However, “Tancho Goshiki (Koi of five colors with
Tancho),” and “Tancho Hariwake” are rare.

Tancho do not form a single, independent kind of Nishikigoi; they
all can be bred from Kohaku, Taisho Sankshoku or Showa Sanshoku.

Their red patch happen to show up only in the head region. Tancho, therefore, can not be produced in bulk even if you so wish.

The essential point for appreciation is the red patch in the head region, of course.

The red head patch sitting right at the center of the head region is the best.

The white skin is also important as it is the milky white color that sets the red head patch off to advantage.

The Sumi of Tancho Sanshoku and Tancho Showa are the same as Bekko and Shiro Utsuri respectively.

Posted on

butterfly koi fish you need to know

butterfly koi fish

how long do koi fish live

Koi usually live around 20 or 30 years. The oldest Koi on record was named

Hanako. It purportedly lived to be about 226 years old.

It lived in a pond that was in a stable area (read low geologic
activity) and was passed down from generation to generation.

how long do koi live

What is the oldest living koi fish?
226 Year Old Koi Carp ‘Hanako’ The oldest known fish (and indeed
one of the longest living vertebrate ever recorded) was a beautiful
scarlet coloured female Koi called ‘Hanako’ (pronunced hah-nah-koh; translated as ‘Flower Maid’).

butterfly koi fish has a long fin koi fish they are also called dragon carp.

They have elongated finnage the pectoral, caudal and pelvic fins.

They are high breed from the common carp,
cyprinus carpio including wide varieties of wild carp races with a
domesticated koi (” Nishikigoi”)

butterfly koi fish was breed in the mid-20th century as a result of an
effort to improve the hardiness of traditional koi fish.

Butterfly koi fish are breed by Japanese breeders who interbred the
wild Indonesian longfin river carp with traditional koi fish.

The resulting fish had longer fins, long barbells, pompom nostrils,
and were hardier than koi fish.

These were known in Japan as “onagaoi” or “hire naga goi”, or translated in English “long tail carp”.

It was Randy LeFever, the son of Wyatt LeFever, a noted koi fish
breeder was credited with suggesting they looked like butterflies, a
trait for which the breed is named.

They are also sometimes referred to as Dragon Koi fish.

For clarification, the word koi is wholly inaccurate for describing these fish;

Koi are, as dictated by the Japanese breeders, Nishikigoi,

butterfly koi fish have long-finned carp are Hirenagagoi.

The word koi has been given to these fish to increase their resale
value and popularity in garden centres and the like

Conformation – The ideal shape of a koi has been set by tradition to be generously oval.

By contrast, butterfly koi fish are naturally more slender.

This difference is amplified by the fact that traditional koi judging is
done from a top-down viewing angle.

Relationship of fin to body – The ratio of fin-to-body is an
important scoring criteria in nishikigoi competitions.

By design, longfin embody a ratio that exceeds the standards
applied to nishikigoi by 500 to 1000 percent.

butterfly koi types Pattern differences – Great energy has been
given to developing butterfly koi versions of

traditional koi patterns, (e.g. kohaku, sanke, showa, utsuri and ogon).

Butterfly koi, however, exhibit these patterns in a slightly different way.

How big do butterfly koi grow in a year?
Their barbels (whiskers) even grow long and can fork into elaborate designs.

Butterfly koi seem to lack some of the body size of regular koi,

but the overall fish can run as long as 36 to 40 inches in the right pond with plenty of food.

They are graceful and pleasant to watch swim.

How long does a butterfly koi live?
The short answer is they can live over 200 years.

The oldest known Koi was Hanako who lived to be 226 years.

But the reality is most Koi fish do not live anywhere close to that long.

water gardens

A water garden can be an elaborate planting in and around a pond,
or something simple in a watertight container.

You can start small, with a hollowed-out stone that catches
rainwater, a watertight, patio-sized container or jump right in with
an in-ground pond with water lilies, fish and a fountain

water quality

Water quality refers to the chemical, physical, biological, and radiological characteristics of water.

It is a measure of the condition of water relative to the
requirements of one or more biotic species and or to any human need or purpose.

pond keepers facebook fanpage

Pond and garden keepers has 21804 members. All about Koi, fish keeping, gardening and pond projects

koi carp

Koi carp (Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758) are a brightly coloured
fish native to Asia and Europe.

komei koshihara is the last owner of Hanako

The Life of Hanako Koi
While her initial place of spawning is not accurately documented,
in 1966, her last and final owner, Dr. Komei Koshihara revealed that
she spent most of her life in a quiet pond at the foot of Mt.

Ontake in a locality near Oppara, Higashi-Shirakawa Village, Kamo County.

According to the Koshihara, the ravine was carefully constructed by
his ancestors only keeping Hanako’s well-being in mind, a factor he
believes led to her thinking that she was fondly loved by and was part of the family.

Pure water perennially trickled down into the pond, allowing
ultimate favorable conditions for Hanako.

learn more here 

mud pond

What is a koi mud pond?

Koi Mud Pond. Have clear, safe water and the benefits of mud to keep koi fish healthy for less with TerraPond.

Koi fish grow, stay vital, resist disease, and develop brilliant colors
living in ion charged mineral ponds. Mud is the perfect environment for koi and top koi farms raise koi in them.