koi pond storm preparation what you need to know 2018

koi pond storm preparation

First off, take time to breathe. You pride and joys are probably fine. They may be somewhat traumatized by the whole experience, but that would be any pet caught in an unusual situation.

Unless extreme damage was done, their health probably is not an
an issue, but their home may be in need of some repairs.

You may have been completely prepared for the storm, or the storm may have taken you by complete surprise.

Whatever the case may be, you must jump into action as soon as
you physically can to ensure that no further damage is done to your pond.

First, you must undo all of your storm precautions to survey the possible damage.

If you netted your pond, clear as much debris off the net as possible and remove the netting.

Once you removed the netting you will be able to survey the damage and the condition that your fish are in.

If high waters were expected and your sand bagged the area around
you pond, as long as the water level is normal, remove all sand bags so that you can easily access your pond.

Do not get discouraged if things seem out of place, and it may not be as bad as it originally looks.

Once you have removed all netting and other precautions, take time to look at the area.

If any debris is present, remove it by skimming and netting. If plants or decorations are uprooted or out of place, replace them to their rightful area.

If you find major damage to your pond, it is important to remove your Koi as soon as possible.

Proper bagging and transporting techniques may be needed if the
damage done will take a large amount of time to fix, but there are
several temporary options available if damage can be fixed quickly.

You may want to consider using a children’s pool to house your Koi.

If nothing is available at the time, get into contact with your local
pet store or zoo, as they may have program available to help you house your Koi until maintenance can be done.

Once you have decided that only small repairs are needed, then you must focus on the water quality.

You water may seem cloudy or murky due to the storm and the amount of extra water from rainfall.

If the storm lasted for a long amount of time, you may be facing ammonia issues as well.

Test your water for Nitrates. If Nitrates are present, add the proper amount of salt to the water.

Typically you would add 3/4 to one pound of salt per 100 gallons of water.

But, if your fish are especially shocked by the situation, or seem to
have sustained any type of injuries, it may be a good idea to add more.

If you have plants in your pond, it may be a good idea to remove them before adding the salt into the water.

Your fish should be the most important issue at this point, not your plants.

If you are having KH issues (especially if it is below 100) you will want to add baking soda to your pond.

Typically you can add 1 cup of unpacked baking soda per 1000 gallons of water.

This will protect your pond from a future pH crash.

Posted 10/30/2012 – 2:44pm by David Pickering

Here is David Pickering post

Yes, I was out fishing on Monday, but it was not for stripers. Fishing anywhere along saltwater on October 29 was simply impossible today due to the enormous surf, high tides, wild winds, and closed roads.

As most of you know, I have made a career out of fishing in nasty weather in both saltwater and freshwater. So, when I knew we were in for a real bad day with hurricane winds and driving rain, I just had to get out fishing. And, the best bet today would be to fish for carp in a protected spot in freshwater. The three largest carp I have ever caught (36 lbs., 36 lbs. 8 oz, and 40 lbs. 8 oz) were all taken on stormy and nasty days that were similar, though not as severe as this. I will tell you that carp just love this weather and usually go on a feeding binge during these events. It was last year during a big storm that I landed the biggest freshwater fish ever taken in Rhode Island waters, a 36 lb. common carp.

During Hurricane Sandy I was in a very safe spot to fish, away from blowing trees and debris as safety is always a concern on these types of days. In fact, the wind was at my back and I had a great view of the storm while watching my rods. The rain was coming down horizontally in sheets and the wind was blowing the trees in the distance sideways as branches were coming down.

And, yes, the carp were hitting as I expected they would. The first fish I landed was a 12 lb. common. Next, was a 20 lb. common carp. Next fish was the surprise of the fall for me. It was a large mirror koi that was a bright red with black spots all over it. It was a rare gorgeous fish, and this fish was only the second koi I have ever landed! Finally, the day ended with a 21 lb. common. All the fish fell for pineapple-flavored Pescaviva fished on a hair-rigged hook and fished ahead of an oatmeal-based method ball.

With fully charged seas and rough and nasty weather expected for the next few days, I will keep my attention geared to freshwater, where I know I can fish. It might be upwards of a week before the ocean clears up and striper fishing resumes.

Here is also a sad story about koi lost in hurricane

Hurricane causes lost Koi

By Karen Pattist

Laura Irish of Middleburg, FL lost her Koi fish during Hurricane Irma. You won’t believe how she found one of them. Story from the local newspaper below.

In some ways, it’s another story stemming from Hurricane Irma, but it really starts about five years ago. Laura and her husband Joel have lived on their Scenic Drive property for about eight years. After nearly losing their house to Tropical Storm Debbie in June 2012, they decided to build a new, higher house on the same parcel, which backs out onto Black Creek.

“Built this house a lot higher, probably six feet higher,” as Laura began the story on Friday, talking with First Coast News.

The couple currently has four hens, three dogs, and a rescue cat, but their menagerie expanded less than a year ago after they discovered a natural spring next to their driveway. They decided to build a Koi pond, knowing the constant flow of pristine water would mean added beauty with minimal maintenance, eventually stocking the pond – complete with waterfall – with 17 Koi fish and a turtle.

“Super healthy,” she described the fish, “I mean, most of them are about this big,” she said, holding her hands about a foot apart.

Then came Irma. Laura figured that the creek would rise.

It did, not just the roughly 14 feet to the driveway and Koi pond, but another 9 feet, almost enough to reach the sub-floor of the elevated home.

“Part of our prep was to put a net over my Koi pond,” Laura said, having figured the netting would keep the fish and turtle in their home.

It didn’t. Several days after the water ebbed, the Irishes removed the debris-laden mesh.

“So, finally we managed to get the net off and looked in. And, nothing, nothing left,” she said with a sigh.

All seemed lost. In this rural area where mountains of waterlogged possessions still line the road, awaiting pickup, it’s hard to figure that any of the fish would have survived wherever nature left them. It’s unfathomable to imagine that any would have been found, but one of them was, several days later, when a friend came by.

“He goes, ‘You’re not going to believe this but there’s a Koi in a swimming pool two blocks over.’ And I said, ‘That’s got to be my Koi’,” Laura said.

Indeed the Koi had somehow floated and swum across at least a quarter-mile of road, forest, and other waterways, ending its hurricane-driven journey inside the in-ground pool at a home on Laurel Road.

Laura and Joel know the family who lives at that home. “So, we went and looked at it, and sure enough it was Dreamsicle,” she said, identifying the fish by name.

 

what happens to fish during a hurricane

Fish and other ocean creatures face deadly conditions during a hurricane— sometimes the extreme weather strands them on land or far out at sea.

Hurricanes can generate massive waves, so most sea creatures — including dolphins, whales, and sharks — avoid the rough surface water and swim to calmer seas

How does a hurricane affect fishing?

How does a hurricane affect marine life? Larger marine animals such as sharks seem to be barely affected.

They can detect tiny changes in pressure as larger waves at the surface approach, as well as the reduced surface pressure associated with the storm itself, and they also swim deeper or leave the area.

Do fish survive hurricanes?

Hurricanes can be death sentences for coral and sea creatures that are territorial, meaning they won’t leave their homes to flee to safety, or for creatures that are slow swimmers, such as the seahorse, researchers told Live Science. Other animals, such as sharks and some fish, simply swim out of danger’s way.

learn more about indoor koi pond 

koi fish painting

koi pond maintenance Expectations vs. Reality

koi pond maintenance


koi pond maintenance helps you to maintain the proper water quality for your koi.

It is vitally important for the sake of your koi that you keep the quality of the water as pristine as possible.

Water quality has to do with much more than keeping the water clear.

You will need to purchase a water testing kit so you can check the pond water for –
• pH
• Oxygen
• Ammonia
• Nitrates
• Nitrites

You will also want to make use of a pond skimmer to get the leaves, insects, and other organic debris out of your pond.

Deep Cleaning
Deep cleaning of your pond is usually done twice a year, in the spring and fall.

There are pond maintenance services that you can hire to do this for you, or you can tackle the job yourself.

It really is not a difficult task. You will need to do the following –

• Remove any debris you can see in the water
• Fertilize and prune any plants that live in the pond
• Remove any algae from the pond
• Do a thorough inspection of your filtering system and your pump.
• Check the hose and connectors of your pond equipment
• Check out any pond lighting or pond vacuums you may have
• Drain the pond and add fresh water
• Check the water chemistry, and then take care of any irregularities that pop up.

Removing the Koi
It is understood that you will remove your fish before this deep cleaning takes place!

All sorts of debris and muck will be floating in the water, and you
do not want your fish to struggle for breath while trying to swim.

Koi quarantine tanks are available for purchase in many places.

What is in the Tap Water?
When first setting up your pond, you will probably use a garden hose to fill it with water.

This is fine, but you will also need to add a chlorine neutralizer to the water.

Chlorine is deadly to fish, and can kill them very quickly.
Chloramines are also in tap water, so make sure the neutralizer you use will take care of them as well.

Use your water testing kit each time you add fresh tap water to your
pond to make sure there is no kind of problem with the water.

About once a month is often enough to change out or add new water to the pond.

You can bump this up to every three weeks if the water looks especially needy.

Parasites, Keep Out!
Keep a close watch on your pond for any type of parasite. You can
purchase chemicals to add to the water that will kill any parasites
that may be there, and will also prevent any new parasites from entering the pond.

To Salt, or Not To Salt?
Many people who keep Koi insist on adding salt to their ponds. It can be a good idea in quarantine ponds, as it can help those fish that are suffering from stress. However, salt may cause more trouble than it is worth in a pond for breeders or young Koi.

When a sufficient quantity of salt is placed in the pond water, the skin of the Koi gets slightly irritated.

This causes them to have to produce an extra thick slime coat. That slime coat helps to protect them from parasites and bacteria, which sounds good.

The reality is that salt kept in a pond all year can cause the parasites
that plague your Koi to slowly but surely build up a resistance to the salt.

This will make it harder than ever to kill off the parasites and rid your fish of them once and for all.

A little salt is fine in the Spring to boost the immune system of
your breeders, but make sure to do your regular water changes in
order to clean all the salt out of your pond when this “spring tonic” is used.

Koi Pond Service
Spring pond cleanings are crucial for Fish & KOI ponds and Pondless waterfalls in the NY & CT Area.

Getting a spring pond cleaning is an important step in regaining
your pond’s beauty and functionality after the winter season.

The experts at BG Marine Services. located in Port Chester, NY will
take the necessary steps to ensure that your water feature is
maintained to the highest standards that you book koi pond service here

How much does it cost to maintain a koi pond?

Professionally installed koi ponds cost up to $50,000, depending on
the pond’s size, the experience of the contractor and the materials used. Koi fish can be bought at pet stores and at online koi retailers.

How do I keep algae out of my koi pond?

  • Keep the organic load down by keeping runoff out of the pond and the sludge to a minimum.
  • Don’t over feed or keep more fish than your pond will support.
  • Install a large biological filter and give it time to work, this could take several months.
  • Use enough, and the right type of, aquatic plants.

How do you clean a koi pond?

  • Clean the pond in the spring.
  • Scoop out debris on the surface of the pond.
  • Drain the pond.
  • Remove the koi if your pond is small.
  • Take out the pond pump and any water accessories.
  • Let the sun dry the empty pond for one hour.

How do you maintain a fish pond?

  1. Remember to continue fertilizing your plants as detailed under “Spring”
  2. Remove dead foliage from the pond.
  3. Feed your fish well.
  4. Continue cleaning filter as needed, making sure not to over-clean
  5. Maximize your aeration.
  6. Continue use of bacterial products like Microbe Lift.
  7. Enjoy!

Does barley straw clear ponds?

In ponds that are frequently muddy or those that have a history of
heavy algae growth, two or three times this recommended dose
may be required for the initial treatment.

However, overdosing the pond with barley straw may cause fish
kills because the straw deoxygenates the water as it decays.

 

koi pond maintenance using barley straw
Photo from https://extension.psu.edu

The problem
Excessive algae growth is one of the most common problems
occurring in ponds in Pennsylvania.

Traditional mechanical and chemical control methods are not always efficient or economical.

In recent years, the use of barley straw has become more common
as an alternative method for controlling excessive algae growth.

This method has been extensively studied by Dr. Jonathan
Newman at the Centre for Aquatic Plant Management in Great Britain.

This page summarizes the use of barley straw based on Dr.
Newman’s work and our experiences in Pennsylvania.

When applied at the proper time and rate, barley straw has been a
very successful algae control technique in Pennsylvania ponds.

How does it work?
Barley straw does not kill existing algae, but it inhibits the new growth of algae.

The exact mechanism is poorly understood, but it seems that
barley straw, when exposed to sunlight and in the presence of
oxygen, produces a chemical that inhibits algae growth.

Barley straw does not reduce the growth of other aquatic plants. In
fact, in some cases aquatic plant growth has increased after barley
straw applications because algae are no longer present to compete
with the aquatic plants. learn more here

How do you kill algae in a pond?

Use a long handled brush to pull out the algae at depth. 2.
Treat Water and Kill Off Remaining Algae – Some sources suggest
using a pond algaecide to kill off the remaining algae but we never
recommend unnatural chemicals even if the labels state they are safe for fish and plants.

Can I put hydrogen peroxide in my pond?

Hydrogen peroxide can cause gill damage if applied directly to koi.

Pour peroxide into the pond away from the fish, so it is diluted by the time it reaches them.

Use of hydrogen peroxide to increase oxygen levels is only a temporary solution. Continual use can damage the koi’s gills.