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koi fish tanks guide in building a koi fish aquarium

koi fish tanks

koi fish tanks What size tank do you need for a koi fish?

koi fish tanks

So, if our 125-gallon tank will hold 1.25 12-inch koi, then it will hold 11 6-inch koi (1.25 X 9 = 11).

It is essential to realize that as the koi fish grow, you will have to remove koi fish from the koi fish tank to maintain the proper load balance.

 

Can you put a koi fish in a tank?

Keep koi fish  in large aquariums for a few months at a time. If you live in an apartments, you may have to keep koi in aquariums for their entire life.

That is possible, as long as you do not overcrowd the aquarium with too many koi. … Your tank should have 1 cubic foot per 1 inch of koi fish length

Obtain an aquarium that is large enough to contain the number of koi you have.

Koi need a large volume tank to thrive. Your tank should have 1 cubic foot per 1 inch of koi fish length.

Multiple the tank’s height by width by length to determine the tank’s cubic footage.

Put the aquarium on a stand that can support the weight of the tank, and find a location in your home that can accommodate the weight of the tank safely, such as near a support wall or on a concrete basement floor.

Place a substrate layer at the bottom of the tank at least 2 inches deep. Use a mixture of small gravel and larger gravel or rock pieces. Koi are bottom-feeders, and will enjoy sifting through the substrate.

Install an external filter to the aquarium that is made for the number of gallons in your tank. You may choose to use a carbon filter, as well, to remove toxins and impurities in the water.

Install an aquarium heater to regulate the temperature. Although koi fish  can withstand water below 40 degrees and above 80 degrees, koi kept indoors should have a heater regulating the temperature to 68 to 77 degrees. That will maintain the metabolism at a good level.

Keep an koi aquarium cover on top of the tank at all times to prevent koi fish from jumping out. Use a cover with a light inside since koi fish also need 12 hours of light a day.

Test the water’s pH regularly. Koi like a neutral pH between 7 and 9. Add pH stabilizer to the tank water if the pH gets too low.

Perform partial water changes weekly. Remove 10 to 20 percent of the tank water and then top off the tank with tap water, adding dechlorinator to the new water before pouring it into the tank.

Well water not been treated with chlorine may not need a dechlorinator.

However, let the well water sit out for several hours, and then test the pH. Treat the water with pH stabilizer if it is below 7.

Feed the koi  fish only what they can eat in five minutes. Overfeeding will pollute the water.

How many gallons of water does a koi fish need?

We generally offer two rules of thumb regarding the number of koi in a pond or koi fish tank . First, average water conditions will allow 1 inch of fish per 10 gallons of water (or 100 inches for a 1,000-gallon pond).

 

Do koi fish grow to the size of their koi fish tank?

There is an element of truth to this, but it is not as innocent as it sounds and is related more to water quality than koi fish tank size.

When properly cared for, koi fish will not stop growing. Most fishes are in fact what are known as indeterminate growers. This means that, unlike humans, they grow until they die.

Though their growth rate when they are about 3 years old up will be slower compared to their 0 to 1 years age.

 

How much space does a koi fish need?

Koi fish should be stocked based on a reasonable estimate of their full growth, not on their size at purchase.

Most well-maintained koi ponds will support 1″ of fish per ten gallons of water.

Though some koi in the largest ponds will grow to 36″, we recommend using an average of 21″.

 

How long does it take for a koi fish to grow to full size?

The oldest koi was 226 when it died in the 1970s indeed one of the longest living vertebrate ever recorded) was a beautiful scarlet coloured female Koi called ‘Hanako’ (pronunced hah-nah-koh; translated as ‘Flower Maid’).

it can take more than 10 years to get to full size.

Basically if you raise them the cheap American way, in a backyard pond or a mini pool at a Chinese restaurant, you can expect to keep them for about 30 years and get foot long fish.

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types of koi The Different Varieties of Koi fish you need to know

koi fishes pictures types of koi

There are fourteen different varieties of Koi, with a fifteenth variety
that is used as a sort of a catchall variety for all of the different
types of koi that do not quite fit into one of the other fourteen slots.

This last variety is known as the Kawarimono, and a large percentage of Koi are placed in this category.

Inclusion in this variety has no bearing on the quality of the Koi.

Placement in the fifteenth variety simply means that there is
something not quite right about the fish.

It may be attractive and healthy, but it does not fit the “breed standard” for any of the individual varieties.

All Koi have a unique beauty, but those who are entered in shows must resemble this standard.

Crossbreeding For Different Varieties

The many different color varieties that you will see were brought to
fruition by crossbreeding fish that are closely related to each other.

Crossbreeding tends to make a genetic line more stable, bringing
out the good qualities while pushing back the bad.

Those who are preparing to be Koi breeders are advised to learn
about the different types of koiv arieties so that they will know
which ones they are interested in breeding and raising.

Asagi

types of koi asagi koi
Photo from hanoverkoifarms.com

The Asagi Koi is one of the initial varieties of Koi. The body of the Asagi is a blue color, with the lighter shades of blue most preferred.

The scales on the skin of the Asagi are given high importance. The edges of these scales must all be equal in length, and must be on the entire body of the koi from its tail to its head.

The red (Hi) color that appears on the sides of the Asagi, on the head, and on the fins sometimes looks more orange than red.

The Hi needs to be symmetrical on both sides of the Koi’s cheeks all the way to its eyes.

Utsurimono

Three varieties of the Utsurimono have been painstakingly developed. These are the –

Ki Utsuri, which is a yellow and black Koi

types of koi ki utsuri
Photo from www.usakoi.com

Hi Utsuri, a red and black Koi

types of koi hi utsuri
Photos from cachepkoi.com.vn

Shiro Utsuri Shiro, a white and black koi

types of koi shiro utsuri
Photo from www.aquariumdomain.com

The Utsurimono should be heavily marked with black (Sumi) in
order to display a prominent contrast with the yellow, red, or white.

All colored need to be somewhat balanced, as this helps to call attention to the pattern on the Koi.

The Utsurimono is sometimes mistaken for the Bekko koi. There are two differences to look for that will allow the observer to tell the two varieties of Koi apart.

The main variation is that the Utsurimono is a black Koi with red,
white, or yellow markings, while the Bekko Koi are either white, yellow, or red Koi that have black markings.

The Utsurimono also feature black markings on their heads that run all the way down to their noses. The Bekko Koi do not have black markings in this area.

Bekko

The Bekko variety is a white, yellow or red Koi that can be identified by the unique black markings.

This assortment has small and very simple black markings that are not included on the head of the Koi.

The Shiro Bekko is white with black markings.
The Aka Bekko is red with black markings
The Ki Bekko is yellow with black markings, and is considered to be rare.

Shusui koi

types of koi shusui koi
Photo from thefishdoctor.co.uk

The Shusui is the result of a crossbreeding that took place in 1910. One Yoshigoro Akiyama crossed an Asagi Koi with a Doitsu Mirror carp.

He ended up with a fish he called the Shusui. The color of this Koi is comparable to that of the Asagi.

The Shusui has a head that is a bluish gray color, with red on the jaws of the Koi.

The skin is a lovely sky blue, with darker fish scales outlining the lateral and dorsal lines.

Lines of red run down the back from the gills to the tail. There are several types of Shusui, including –

Hi Shusui
Hana Shusui
Ki Shusui
Pearl Shusui

Koromo

The Koromo koi is a relatively new type of Koi that appeared around 1950.

The Koromo came into existence by crossing the Kohaku with the Naruni Asagi.

The Koromo has a lovely pattern of deep red edged with black on a white background/body.

The red is described as being in a lace pattern, and the markings of
the Koromo are prone to variations, depending on which variety you are looking at.

The most commonly seen varieties include –

Budo Sanke
Koromo Sanke
Koromo Showa

Budo Goromo

types of koi budo goromo koi
Photo from Inland koi channel

Budo Goromo are a Goromo with shading that completely covers the Hi, creating a purple color.

Budo means grape in Japanese. Look for a Budo Goromo with a Kohaku pattern on it’s back.

What makes an Budo Goromo?
Goromos were created by accident.

How? A breeder was breeding Goshikis and a goshiki with a white background and a net pattern on the Hi appeared.

This Koi was carefully bred and now we have the Goromo variety.

Ai-Goromo

Sumi-Goromo

 

Goshiki

In Japan, the word “goshiki” means five colors, which are red, white, black, dark blue and blue.

All of these colors can be mixed on the body of one fish. The result of this is a Koi that has a rather purplish tint.

Originally created by crossing the Asgai Koi with the Sanke Koi, the
Goshiki has patterns that are quite striking.

These surprisingly lovely fish are very popular with those who keep Koi as a hobby.

Kawarimono

types of koi fish koi fish image kawarimono

The Kawarimono classification is given to many non-metallic fish
who do not seem to fit in any other variety of Koi.

This classification should in no way be considered as a variety in which to dump the oddly marked Koi! Many gorgeous crossbred Koi come from the Kawarimono variety.

Often, these are not bred on purpose, but appear in a spawning as a “sport” koi.

Generally, the Kawarimono are divided into three groups –

Single-colored Koi
Black Koi
Other colors of Koi

Ochiba Shigure

types of koi ochiba shigure
Photo from https://mpks.org/

Have you ever seen a soft gray colored koi with gold patterning?

If you have, you likely would not forget, because it is very different
looking than the brightly colored koi we are used to seeing.

This quietly refined and elegant koi is called an Ochiba Shigure,
which aptly translates to “autumn leaves on water”.

The delicately reticulated scales do indeed give an impression of
leaves floating on a calm pond, with the golden-leaved trees reflected on the surface.

A relative newcomer on the koi scene, having been around only
since about the mid-90s, the Ochiba is actually a cross between a gray Soragoi and a golden brown chagoi.

These two ancestors have a reputation of being the friendliest of
koi, and the Ochiba has happily inherited that trait.

Many hobbyists will have one of these types koi in their collection
for the purpose of encouraging other, shyer koi to “come out of their shells” and be more sociable.

They will be the first to come up to greet you as you approach your pond, and will readily eat from your hand.

learn more here

kumonryu koi

types of koi kumonryu
Photos from Koiphen.com

Kumonryu. The Kumonryu is a Doitsu (German) koi that has a jet
black pattern that emerges like billowing black clouds against a white background.

 

beni kumonryu koi

types of koi beni kumonryu koi
Photo from http://www.no1koi.com

Beni Kumonryu came from Kumonryu and Doitsu Kohaku. Since Doitsu varieties have no scales, their colors can be very bright and bold.

Beni Kumonryu are a rare form of Kumonryu, they have red along with the black and white.

They are scaless and their pattern actually changes throughout the year.

No one is absolutely sure what causes the color change, but the two
best theories are a change in temperature or a change in pH. Beni Kumonryu are usually black in the winter.

The white and red usually appears in the spring and summer.

 

Chagoi koi

types of koi chagoi koi
Photo from
Helmy Iskandar

The Chagoi is known as the “gentle giant”. They are not the most colorful or fanciest of Koi varieties, but make of for that in other fabulous ways!

Chagoi are the friendliest and most docile Koi breed to the point
that most actually like interaction with people.

In as such they tend to make all of your other fish more friendly and trusting.

They are also known to grow large and grow quickly. They come in
various shades from brown, reddish brown, beige,copper/rootbeer,
and even shades of green. learn more about chagoi at hanoverkoifarms.com

 

Soragoi Koi

types of koi soragoi koi
Photos from
Tuấn Huỳnh Ngọc

Soragoi, similar to Chagoi, are koi of a solid grey or silver color, combined with a subtle net pattern.

Also like Chagoi, mature Soragoi are very docile and will be among the first koi in your pond to learn to hand feed. … Soragoi belong to the Ogon group of koi, which appeared in the Showa Period (1926-1989).

Ochiba-Shigure

Ochiba-Shigure is an interesting name for a Koi. The words translate to mean “dead leaves on the water”.

These fish are clothed in the basic colors of gray and green with a
network of brown lines, rather like the stems of a dead leaf.

Hikarimono (Ogon)

The word “Hikari” translates from the Japanese to mean “metallic”.

“Mono” means one particular single color. This means that the ogon koi is classified as a highly metallic-colored variety of Koi. There are –

Metallic silver, or Platinum ogon koi,

Platinun- Ogons are metallic white and are one of the most popular Ogons.

The color should be as white as fresh mountain snow. As with other Ogons

types of koi platinum ogon
Photo from http://cacanhthaihoa.com

Metallic yellow, or Yamabuki ogon koi.

types of koi yamabuki ogon
photo from http://splendorkoi.com

These two colors are the most common, and the easiest shades of ogon koi to purchase.

There is also the –

Fuji ogon koi, where only the head of the Koi is metallic
Orenji ogon koi, which is all orange like a common goldfish, with a red splotch on its back. Goldfish lovers are usually quite fond og the Orenji.

Except for the Fuji, the metallic color of the ogon koi must
be the same from the head to the tail, and even flow down to the ends of each fin to be considered “correct”.

The size of the fins also matters a great deal. Everyone wants to see long fins on the ogon koi, as they help to counterbalance the plain Koi body.

Ogon koi are a single solid colour with a metallic appearance. This variety is very popular, particularly with those new to keeping koi.

These fish can be a variety of attractive colours. Cream specimens
are rare and the most popular choices are bright yellow (Yamabuki
ogon koi) and Platinum (Purachina ogon koi).

Hikarimoyo-mono

kio fish pictures hikarimoyo

Any Koi that are metallic and have several colors, but do not come from Utsuri lineage are in this group.

The Hikarimoyo-mono was created by crossing a Platinum Ogon
with several other varieties, none of which had any Utsuri genes at all. This cross resulted in the

  • Gin Bekko
  • Kujaku koi

types of koi kujako koi
Photo from masterfisch.co.uk

The Kujaku is a metallic or Ogon koi with the reticulated net-like pattern of the Asagi on its back. …

The development of high quality Kujaku has led to their being
judged in a category of their own at recent koi shows.

Kujaku are koi with a solid white base, accented by a black net pattern along with patterns of red/orange/yellow.

The net pattern is created by a black edging on each individual scale.

Variations of Kujaku include Doitsu Kujaku, Tancho Kujaku and Maruten Kujaku.

There is another group in this classification, which has fish of two
colors, either gold, orange, or platinum.

These Koi are called Hariwake. The Orenji Hariwake and the Hariwake matsuba koi are two examples of this variety.

Hariwake koi

types of koi hariwake koi
Photo from http://www.koiphen.com

types of koi matsuba koi
Photo from hanoverkoifarms.com

The matsuba koi is basically an Ogon with reticulation. It is a one colored metallic koi with dark pigment on the scales.

This variety is in the Hikari Muji class, and is considered one color
regardless of the contrasting scales.

KIN matsuba koi are orange-red metallic skin, GIN matsuba koi are platinum based.

kikusui koi

types of koi kikusui koi
Photo from Koi des Tages

Kikusui – Kikusui. Although technically they are the Doitsu version
of Hariwake, scaleless white koi with patterns of orange or yellow

goshiki koi

types of koi goshiki koi
Photo from http://cachepkoi.com.vn

goshiki koi pronounced (gosh-key or Go-she-key by some) are an interesting breed of Koi. The name means ‘five colors” in Japanese, but frankly it is not a fitting name in my opinion with today’s goshiki koi. You do not readily see five colors at a glance and it is a stretch to do so no matter. This is one breed I feel the Japanese creators misnamed.

Most times the Japanese names are right on the money as for
descriptive names that tell a story of what the Koi breed looks like.

The name was probably created because of the look of some of the
first goshiki koi  created when they crossed a Sanke to and Asagi. Today yet I don’t see the “:five colors) easily. Anyway, enough about that.

The goshiki koi basically a white based Koi that has a fishnet black
pattern on top of the white base that covers the entire back and
runs from the top of the back down to the lateral line (center line of
the side of the fish that runs from gill plate to tail base).

On top of the fishnet pattern there is a red or orange pattern like the Kohaku.

This pattern is called the Hi (hee) plate. One difference in this Hi
plate from Goshiki to Kohaku is that the Goshiki Hi tends to be
much thicker, bolder and more neon in color intensity as
compared to the Kohaku Hi plate which can be a glossy red/orange but not neon.

The Goshiki Hi plate actually glows and gives the impression of
thickness to the point that the Hi plate can look like a sticker stuck on top of the fishes fishnet pattern.

There are also offshoot breeds from Goshiki called Goshiki Sanke and Goshiki Showa. We won’t get into those details now though.

The term peacock koi refers to the five colors on the body of the koi.

The base color of this variety is white and the fins are generally white and free of any pigment.

The pattern markings on Goshiki are red, or Hi. … Kloubec Koi Farm is a breeder of Japanese Goshiki variety koi.

Good read from http://nishikigoi.life article written by Author Mark Gardner

Goshiki, a five coloured fish, created in the early 1900s have
developed tremendously in recent years to the point where some
consider them the 4th Gosanke, in place of Shiro Utsuri.

In this article we’ll look at the history of the variety, some of the
most prominent breeders and the huge array of different styles that exist.

HISTORY
According to Dr. Takeo Kuroki’s book ‘Modern Nishikigoi’ Goshiki
were produced by crossing Asagi with Aka Sanke or Aka Bekko in 1918. According to Shuji Fujita’s ‘Nishikigoi Mondo’ a primitive
Goshiki existed from the mutation of Narumi Asagi and were
known as Goshiki Asagi.

Masayuki Amano’s 1968 ‘General Survey of Fancy Carp’ gives
almost no mention to Goshiki, indeed the only references appear in
reproductions of Masamoto Kataoka’s gene trees.

The first shows Goshiki Asagi being produced from Narumi Asagi
and Aka Bekko, to then be bred with Kohaku to produce Koromo. The other shows Goshiki coming from Narumi Asagi.

goshiki koi genealogy 1

goshiki koi genealogy history

learn more

Kohaku

types of koi kohaku koi

The Kohaku is a White koi with red, or Hi markings. The color white should look as if it is freshly fallen snow,

and there should be no superfluous marks on the white to distract the eye from the pristine color.

The clarity between the Hi color and the white is called the Kiwa.

The pattern on the Kohaku should have depth and should be as well balanced as possible.

There are several different pattern types, including the –

  • Inazuma, which means lightning strike in Japanese.
  • Nidan is the name for two red or Hi markings on the white background of the fish.
  • Sandan is the name for three red or Hi markings on the white fish.
  • Yondan is the name for four red or Hi markings on the Kohaku.
  • learn more about kohaku koi click here https://www.giobelkoicenter.com/kohaku-koi/

 

Taisho Sanke

types of koi kio fish pictures sanke

The Taisho Sanke is a Koi carp with three different colors. In this instance, the colors are red, or Hi, black, or Sumi, and white.

The color depth and the balance of the pattern on the fish is important, just as it is on the Kohaku.

The Taisho Sanke should not have any black (sumi) on the head.

Black (Sumi) is welcome on the fins, and most particularly on the pectoral and the caudal fins. T

his is taken as a sign that the Sumi color should stay even over the entire body of the fish.

The red (Hi) patterns may be on just a part of the body, or can extend back over the entire length of the body.

Showa Sanshoku

koifish pictures showa

The Showa Sanshoku Koi has much more black (Sumi) included in its patterns than does the Taisho Sanke.

In fact, this classification is mostly black with a foreground of red and white markings.

Color depth is very important in this variety. The black (Sumi)should be deep and dark, the color of an object made of the dense and dark black wood known as ebony.

The red (Hi) markings need to be a blood red color, and the white
should be as crisp and clean in appearance as a freshly washed and starched white shirt.

The white color on the Showa Sanshoku should be even and uniform on the base of the pectoral fins.

There are several different varieties of the Showa Sanshoku that can
pop up in other Koi classifications, such as the –

Koromo
Kawarimono (Kage Showa, Kankoko Showa)
Hikari-Utsurimono (Kin Showa)
Tancho Showa

What is a Chagoi koi?

Chagoi Koi – Mr. Personality (Chah’-goy) … You’ll discover this pet is probably more intelligent than other koi in your pond too.

It is almost universally agreed to be the friendliest of the koi
classifications because it is the most aggressive at feeding time and
almost always the first fish to become hand-tame

The Cha-goi is a part of the catchall class known as Kawarimono. “Cha” is the word for a tea-colored Koi that is a very fast grower.

The Cha-goi is very easy to tame, and most people thoroughly enjoy having this variety in their pond.

How many types of koi are there?

Types of Koi Varieties. There are over a 100 different types of koi (Nishikigoi).

To find the proper koi classification you will need to look at their
colors, patterns, and body confirmation.

Each type of koi fish variety has it’s own specific details for
identification and can described based off another classification of Japanese Koi type.

For example, a Showa Sanke is a koi with calligraphic Sumi pattern
on Kohaku and the Goshiki created by breeding Asagi with Kohaku. View popular koi varieties below and click to learn about each type of koi.

What type of fish is a butterfly koi?

https://youtu.be/5m_YzQ3CMXI

Butterfly koi, longfin koi, or dragon carp are a type of ornamental
fish notable for their elongated finnage.

The fish are a breed of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio, which
includes many wild carp races as well as domesticated koi (“Nishikigoi”). … They are also sometimes referred to as Dragon Koi.

Onagaoi

Also known as American koi, Butterfly koi, Longfin koi, and Dragon
koi, the Onagaoi has beautiful long fins reminiscent of a butterfly’s wings.

The Japanese bred these koi, hoping to improve the hardiness of all koi by doing so.

A type of wild fish called Indonesian Longfin river carp were
captured by these breeders to use in breeding experiments.

These carp were bred with koi that were more traditional in appearance.

The fish that resulted from this breeding had the long fins and the resiliency that hoped for.

Koi Purists Dislike the Butterfly

Other breeding experiments carried out in the hopes of
setting the different patterns of traditional koi onto the long finned.

This attempt at crossbreeding was mostly successful. Many koi purists are adamantly against the Onagaoi.

This is the reason why many of the people who sell koi do not offer this variety.

Famous breeders in Japan would not think of breeding the Onagaoi.

These koi are not popular anywhere in the world except for the United States.

What is a ghost koi?

types of koi ghost koi fish

Ghost Koi. … The Ghost Koi that surfaced in the early ’80s are a hybrid mix of wild carp and single-colored metallic Ogon koi.

They are also referred to as Ghost Carp—one of the reasons that
koi purists don’t recognize them as true Nishikigoi at all.

Tancho koi

types of koi tancho koi
Photo and description from simikoi.com

Koi with a red head patch are called “Tancho.” Most common are
“Tancho Kohaku (all-white Koi with Tancho),” “Tancho Sanshoku
(white Koi with Sumi similar to Shiro Bekko, and with Tancho),” and
“Tancho Showa (Showa Sanshoku without red markings except for
Tancho),” etc. However, “Tancho Goshiki (Koi of five colors with
Tancho),” and “Tancho Hariwake” are rare.

Tancho do not form a single, independent kind of Nishikigoi; they
all can be bred from Kohaku, Taisho Sankshoku or Showa Sanshoku.

Their red patch happen to show up only in the head region. Tancho, therefore, can not be produced in bulk even if you so wish.

The essential point for appreciation is the red patch in the head region, of course.

The red head patch sitting right at the center of the head region is the best.

The white skin is also important as it is the milky white color that sets the red head patch off to advantage.

The Sumi of Tancho Sanshoku and Tancho Showa are the same as Bekko and Shiro Utsuri respectively.

Posted on

koi vs goldfish HOW ARE GOLDFISH AND KOI DIFFERENT?

koi vs goldfish

koi vs goldfish HOW ARE GOLDFISH AND KOI DIFFERENT?

koi vs goldfish Goldfish and Koi may have some similarities, but they are definitely two different fish.

The Goldfish (Carassius auratus) is over a thousand years old, and was created by the selective breeding of a type of fish known as the Prussian Carp.

The plan was to develop different color mutations, and this idea was very successful.

The changes in the fish were so distinct that the Prussian Carp and the Goldfish are now thought of as two completely different species of fish.

Goldfish migrated to Japan and Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

 

The Common Carp and the Koi
The background of the Koi contains a fish known as the common Carp. In fact, the Koi fish is a common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) that has been severely culled over time for color and pattern.

Contrary to popular belief, the Koi is still a common Carp. All that is needed to prove this is allowing a group of carp to breed with each other at will for several generations.

The natural and original color of these fish will reappear by the second or the third generation.

koi vs goldfish
Goldfish are not as large as Koi. Their bodies come in an array of different shapes, and their fins and tails can be put together in several diverse configurations.

Koi share a universal body shape, but have a wider variety of body colors and patterns than the common Goldfish.

Koi also have a slender barbell on their lip that resembles a whisker.

Sterile Offspring
Even though Goldfish and Koi may look somewhat similar, especially when they are young, remember that each comes from a different genus of the carp.

Goldfish and Koi are able to interbreed and will produce young fish, but these fish are always sterile.

 

Are goldfish and koi fish the same thing?

Goldfish are actually descended from crucian carp, while the koi have barbels, grow longer, and are in fact a fancy domesticated version of the common carp.

Although more widely known in the wild, the koi fancy is more “elite” than the goldfish scene, with millions of dollars being invested in the finest fish

 

Do koi and goldfish breed?

Although studies have revealed that the hybrids are anatomically intact, they are sterile.

Therefore, you can only get koi-goldfish hybrids by mating koi and goldfish; the hybrids themselves will not produce offspring. Also, the hybrids will not have barbels.

 

 

Posted on

koi fish origin you need to know

are koi fish chinese or japanese

koi fish origin and what is the koi fish history

koi fish origin The Koi fish has an interesting history.

They are the national fish of the country of Japan, and a member of the carp family (Cyprinus carpio).

This is why some people call the fish Koi Carp.

Koi are also called warrior or samurai fish in Japan.

These names have nothing to do with their disposition. In fact, it is safe to assume that most of the Koi you will see are lovers instead of fighters!

Koi are also known as Nishikigoi, which means, “brocaded carp” in Japan and other locations.

Yet another title for these interesting fish is “Japanese Carp”, which
is rather redundant, as the word “koi” means “domesticated carp” in Japanese.

are koi fish japanese or chinese Where Did the Koi Come From?
There is some debate as to where the Koi originated.

Several authorities on these fish believe that these colorful fish first
appeared in the country of Persia, which is now Iran. From Persia,

the Koi gradually moved into and through the rest of the prehistoric world.

The fossils of Koi that are around 20 million years old were found in the southern part of China.

China is koi fish origin birthplace of the koi fish

Koi fish are actually a mutation form of carp. Carp developed
patches of colors such as white, red, and blue in their natural
habitats in the Black, Caspian, and Aral seas in Asia, and China is the true beginning of Koi fish.

According to Chinese history Confucius’s son was given a mutated
carp by king Shoko of Ro and from then on the fish became the subject of much Chinese artwork paintings.

Koi fish was brouth to Japan, these carp were breed as a food source
due to their resilient nature, this was the beginning of the Japanese Koi fish.

Koi as a Food Supplement
The first mention of Koi was in a Chinese book written anywhere
from 265 to 316 A.D. The text describing them said that the koi fish patterns were black, red, white, and blue.

Up until around 800 A.D., the common carp was raised in Japan as a protein food supplement.

Historians are not sure exactly what was done with Koi from the
second century until the seventeenth century,

but they theorize that the fish were so popular with the Japanese
natives that these people gave them to friends, who gave them to
friends, and on and on until the Koi extended across the Orient.

Koi Are Very Versatile
Koi Carp seem to be survivalists, and their capability to adapt and
thrive in so many diverse climates and water environments was
responsible for the fish doing well in so many places.

Selective breeding during this time accomplished several different pattern variations of the Koi.

The most common color during this period was the red and white Kohaku koi.

The Tokyo Exposition
In 1914, the variety of Koi known as the Niigata was taken to Tokyo
for inclusion in an exposition, which was held every year.

It was during this time that people all over Japan became enamored
of the Koi, and started to keep them in outdoor ponds at their homes.

Soon after this period, the fascination with koi spread around the world. Today, people are still captivated with these gorgeous fish.

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facts about fish (japanese koi fish) you need to know

facts about fish japanese koi fish

facts about fish (japanese koi fish) you need to know

facts about fish the japanese koi fish why japanese koi fish keeping is fast growing now.


The hobby of keeping Koi is a fascinating one that can become a lucrative business with a little research and a lot of work.

Owning Koi fish is a relaxing pastime that you will enjoy throughout your life.

The japanese koi fish is one of the most beautiful fish in existence.

Their colors are eye-catching and their agile bodies are quite graceful when gliding through the water of their koi pond.

A group of japanese koi fish can live for more than two hundred years when cared for properly, although 25-35 years seems to be an average lifespan.

Long Lived Fish Need Plenty of Room Since it lives such a long time, the Koi is able to increase in size dramatically, as long as it has a good diet approved for Koi, the proper water conditions, and enough living space.

It is not difficult to care for japanese koi fish, as they require most of the same care as other fish kept by hobbyists.

The main difference is that Koi fish require lots of room, so they are housed in good-sized outdoor ponds.

 

Japanese koi fish Intelligent and Friendly

Koi are intelligent fish, and their antics can be a source of amusement for many years to come.

Koi will swim over to you when you call them, and like to be stroked and petted.

They can be taught to eat out of your hand, which most Koi owners thoroughly enjoy experiencing.

Though they are naturally bottom feeders, they quickly catch on to eating traditional dry Koi food that floats on top of the pond water.

Bet You Can’t Own Just One
Many Koi owners compare owning these fish to eating a bag of potato chips, as it is almost impossible to have just one of them!

Your Koi collection can be for your own pleasure, or you can build a Koi fish business out of your passion for these fish.

A business of this type necessitates a long-term commitment from you, as you are working with living, breathing creatures, which deserve the best of care.

Many people make pets out of their Koi fish , which assures that they get nothing but the best of care.

You will get a kick out of purchasing a feeding ring for your Koi, placing the food inside of it, then watching as the fish scramble over each other to be first in line.

 

Hobby or Home Business
Your koi will become a big part of your life in many ways. As a peaceful, relaxing hobby, raising koi cannot be beaten.

As a business, breeding and selling koi makes a fine home business for a person who has taken the time to learn all

about koi and how to start a breeding program with them. Either way, you should be able to sell many of your koi to others for a rewarding pastime and business.

 

koi fish facts interesting facts about koi fish

  • Koi fish were originally brought to Japan from China and Germany as a food source
  • Koi fish are descendants of common Carp which is resilient and strong and can adapt easily to any environment it can be found all over the world.
  • Koi fish were recognized to the world’s attention after one was given to the Japanese emperor as a gift in 1914 to grace the imperial palaces mote.
  • Koi fish and Goldfish are distant cousins as they are both descendants from wild Carp, but goldfish came about long before koi fish did.
  • The largest koi fish ever recorded was a whopping four feet long and 91 pounds! The monster-sized fish was later sold to the koi enthusiast Geoff Lawton where she received the name Big Girl.
  • A British fish fan has taken delivery of the world’s biggest koi carp – a 4ft monster that tips the scales at a staggering six-and-a-half-stone.
  • The mammoth fish – nicknamed the Big Girl – is the size of a 12-year-old child and three times larger than any other carp in the UK.
  • Enthusiast Geoff Lawton paid an undisclosed sum for the 17-year-old koi from a specialist breeder in Japan. But he has already put a £30,000 plus price tag on the 90lbs specimen.
  • Koi fish eat about anything they are omnivores which means they eat meat and vegetables anything they can find bugs, worms, etc.
  • Koi fish can get sunburns when exposed to intense heat in the summer so get them some shade during summer.
  • Koi fish are sociable they enjoy the company of other koi fish around.
  • Make sure to keep an eye also when adding other types of fish in the pond koi fish have been known to bully non-koi pond mates. in addition, they will eat small species of fish
  • My experience is I tried adding an albino tin foil in my koi pond and the koi eat all my tin foil.
  • The oldest koi fish ever was a koi named Hanako was born in 1791 and didn’t die until 1977 that means she lived to be 226!
  • Koi fish are surprisingly intelligent they can recognized your footstep if you noticed even if you are still distant away coming towards them they will quickly gather near you.
  • They can be train to feed in your hand
  • Koi fish is a symbol of persistence, determination, wealth, success and good luck.
  • Koi fish intense coloration makes them harder to survive because predators such cats and birds can easily find them.
  • Female koi fish can lay as many as 50,000 eggs depending on the female koi fish size the bigger the female koi fish the number of koi eggs increases too
  • There are 24 koi fish varieties of koi fish and counting.
  • A new koi fish variety could be presented at any time but for now there are the Kohaku, Taisho Sanke, Showa Sanshoku, Tancho, Shiro Utsuri, Hi Utsuri, Ki Utsuri, Asagi, Shusui, Matsuba, Platinum Ogon, Yamabuki Ogon, Kujaku, Hariwake, Kikusui, Kumonryu, Beni Kumonryu, Chagoi, Soragoi, Ochiba Shigure,Goromo, Goshiki, Kikokuryu, and the Kin Kikokuryu.
  • Koi fish release ammonia in the water. When large number of koi fish inhabit same pond, level of ammonia can increase rapidly and induce poisoning of fish.
  • During the mating season, female produces thousands of eggs that will be fertilized by male’s sperm in the water. Only 50% of fertilized eggs will survive.
  • Koi fish can mate with goldfish because they are closely related. However, they produce sterile offspring.

 

Do koi fish like to be petted?

Koi are truly friendly and will not eat other fish or fight with each other.

If you are mixing species, make sure the same can be said for the other types of fish in your pond before adding koi.

.Some koi even like to be pet and will come to the surface for a little pat on the head.

What is the oldest koi fish?

koi hanako the oldest koi

At 226 years old, koi Hanako was the longest living fish ever recorded.

Koi Hanako was a beautiful scarlet coloured female fish in Japan.

Her name Hanako is translated “flower girl” in Japanese. Hanako died in July 7, 1977 at a grand old age of 226

 

How expensive is a koi fish?

It is also true that certain varieties of koi are more expensive than others.

A high-quality 6-inch (a white fish with large red patches) may cost $3000.

A high-quality oghon (basically a golden, metallic-colored fish) of the same size may cost $100.

 

 

Did you learn something? if you have any other koi fish facts that you can add and share to our list please leave in the comments below we love to hear from you and add it to our list.