most expensive koi fish New World Record 203Million Yen 101cm Sakai Kohaku – S Legend

most expensive koi fish

New World Record 203 Million Yen Approximately Singapore Dollars $2.5 Million or USD $1.8 Million

101cm Sakai Kohaku – S Legend Grand Champion – All Japan Koi Show 2017 Offspring of Neo Universe

Congratulations to Sakai Fish Farm & Huajin Consulting Co.,Ltd.
#SakaiFishFarm

most expensive koi fish Sakai Fish Farm – Super Auction Super Kohaku No 001 Sex: Female – Size: 101cm – Age: 9 year SOLD OUT 203.000.000¥ ~ 1.800.000$

Excerpt Posted from https://www.facebook.com/JapanKoiclub

Big Money
As S LEGEND (Neo Universe), 101cm b.t.w., goes into the Auction. For many people the most beautiful Koi ever… And of course
biggest candidate to win the 50th edition of the All Japan Shinkokai, next year februar in Tokyo!

Earlier this year Kentaro had already 8 bits over 100.000.000 yen
in (at least according to the rumors), but he didn’t want to sell her.

He said… “We will all wait untill the start of October and put her in the autumn auction”. So now it’s big time!

Will she really destroy the 1 million US dollar border.
Well, lets not talk about money… Let’ enjoy the beauty of one of the finest Koi ever bred on this planet.

A small movie put together by the Zanmai-Team when this beauty
took Grand Champion at the Shinkokai in Tokyo in 2017. Magic!

most expensive koi fish
Photos from https://www.facebook.com/JapanKoiclub
most expensive koi fish
https://www.facebook.com/JapanKoiclub
most expensive koi fish
https://www.facebook.com/JapanKoiclub

How much is a large koi fish worth?

It is also true that certain varieties of koi are more expensive than others. A high-quality 6-inch (a white fish with large red patches) may cost $3000.

A high-quality oghon (basically a golden, metallic-colored fish) of
the same size may cost $100.

Why are koi so expensive?

 

Good koi are expensive because it is a lot of chance and great
selective breeding, they usually spawn one a year and the odds of getting a lot of great animals is very low.

They are expensive to keep because of water use, electricity, high quality food and labor.

How much do koi sell for?

While that may seem like a lot for one fish, some breeders will pay an astronomical$20,000 for a highly prized adult koi.

Younger koi around four inches can sell for $10 or less for less serious koi owners. But pricing varies everywhere.

most expensive koi fish sold

World’s most expensive fish bought for Dh6.7 million. A red and
white Koi Carp fish was sold for a record £1.4 million (Dh6.7
million) in an auction in Japan to became the world’s most expensive fish.

How much is the most expensive koi fish?

A piece of art, some of these fish can be worth Millions. A 76-cm
(30-in) long ginrin showa koi, which won supreme championship
in nationwide Japanese koi shows in 1976, 1977, 1979 and 1980, was sold two years later for 17 million yen (then £60,000). They can now sell for upto $ 2 Million.

How much do koi sell for?

While that may seem like a lot for one fish, some breeders will pay an astronomical$20,000 for a highly prized adult koi.

Younger koi around four inches can sell for $10 or less for less serious koi owners. But pricing varies everywhere.

How much do baby koi fish cost?

It is also true that certain varieties of koi are more expensive than others.

A high-quality 6-inch (a white fish with large red patches) may cost $3000.

A high-quality oghon (basically a golden, metallic-colored fish) of
the same size may cost $100.

why are koi fish so expensive

Good koi are expensive because it is a lot of chance and great
selective breeding, they usually spawn one a year and the odds of getting a lot of great animals is very low.

They are expensive to keep because of water use, electricity, high quality food and labor.

How much does it cost for a koi fish?

It is also true that certain varieties of koi are more expensive than others. A high-quality 6-inch (a white fish with large red patches) may cost $3000.

A high-quality oghon (basically a golden, metallic-colored fish) of
the same size may cost $100.

Why are koi fish so special?

Why are koi fish so popular – What do they signify? … Koi fish are always at ease in the water, flowing as the tide runs deep under water.

Feng shui, a spiritual form of organization and placement of
objects, says that having the spirit of the koi near you will attract
good luck, fortune, and spiritual benefits.

If you want to purchase our koi fish buy it here  koi fish for sale philippines

sakai fish

Sakai Fish Farm – Higashihiroshima-shi, Hiroshima, Japan – Fish Farm …
https://www.facebook.com › Places › Higashihiroshima-shi, Hiroshima, Japan › Farm
Rating: 4.9 – ‎26 votes
Phone, Suggest a phone number · Address. 大和町上徳良1067; Higashihiroshima-shi, … Sakai Fish Farm, Higashihiroshima-shi, Hiroshima, Japan.

About Sakai Fish Farm – 阪井養魚場
sff-koi.com/en/about-sakai-fish-farm/
The history of our Nishikigoi breeding goes back to more than 120 years ago. Around 1890, Ichiroji Sakai, the founder of Sakai Fish Farm, had started breeding .

The history of our Nishikigoi breeding goes back to more than 120 years ago. Around 1890, Ichiroji Sakai, the founder of Sakai Fish Farm, had started breeding Magoi for needs of animal protein.

Thereafter, my grandfather Tadamichi Sakai had taken breeding of Magoi, while starting to breed colored and patterned koi for entertainment.

Those colored koi were born as a mutant in Yamakoshimura, Niigata. Then, my father Koji Sakai decided to focus exclusively on Nishikigoi breeding as a family business.

After almost half a century, we have been making steady efforts everyday to breed high-grade Nishikigoi. Not only are we among the first to introduce the scientific breeding style at Nishikigoi industry, but also established a business style by analyzing market. As a result, we are called top-class for blood of Kohaku and Sanke, breeding, finishing, and sales technique, and also marketing technique in Nishikigoi industry.

We first won the grand champion of worldly most prestigious koi show called “All Japan Koi Show” in 2000, then won grand champion for 8 times until 2015. We would like to thank for predecessor’s persistent effort and koi lovers’ warm hearted yet strict teachings. We believe that high probability of winning the great results in nationwide koi show are solely from their effort.

We promise to keep the tradition that our predecessors made, and listen to koi lovers’ voice from now on.

We also collaborate with people of business relationship, and always up to new challenge without fear of failure for the progress of Nishikigoi industry.

To this end, we would like to ask all for the continued support and encouragement.

world record koi

A 76-cm (30-in) long ginrin showa koi, which won supreme championship in nationwide Japanese koi shows in 1976, 1977, 1979 and 1980, was sold two years later for 17 million yen (then £50,000).

What is the largest koi ever recorded?

One would expect Hanako to be a cracking contender here, but with her abysmal 8 kg (18 lbs) weigh-in, she doesn’t come anywhere close to the largest koi carp on record.

The prize as the world’s biggest koi carp goes to Big Girl, a 42 kg (91 lbs) monster of a koi, owned by Geoff Lawton in Wiltshire, England.

Fascinating Story About Hanako – World’s Oldest Koi Fish

Hanako, a beautiful scarlet colored female Japanese koi fish, lived to be 226 years old.

Say whaaaat!

Two-hundred-and-twenty-six years old.

That´s 2 centuries + 2 decades + an additional 6 years just for rubbing your fins.

This is a picture of Hanako in Japan just a few years before she died.

world record koi
Photo from http://www.hanakokoi.com/

Imagine her casually swimming around, then slowly moving up on an unsuspected koi trying out really cheesy pick up lines. This was her favorite: “You’re KOI-LICIOUS”. It worked. Every. Damn. Time.

The Birth of Hanako Koi
In the monsoon season of the first year of Horeki (a Japanese era c. 1751 AD), soon after Japan took over experimental harvesting of koi fish from China, among hundreds and thousands of spawns was born this scarlet-colored fish, who came to be loving called “Hanako” by her first caretakers. She was owned by the Koshihara clan of the Tokugawa era who chose the name, which means “flower girl” or “flower maid” in English, based on their affection towards her.

The Life of Hanako Koi
While her initial place of spawning is not accurately documented, in 1966, her last and final owner, Dr. Komei Koshihara revealed that she spent most of her life in a quiet pond at the foot of Mt. Ontake in a locality near Oppara, Higashi-Shirakawa Village, Kamo County.

According the Koshihara, the ravine was carefully constructed by his ancestors only keeping Hanako’s well-being in mind, a factor he believes led to her thinking that she was fondly loved by and was part of the family.

Pure water perennially trickled down into the pond, allowing ultimate favorable conditions for Hanako.

What were Hanako’s Physical Characteristics?

A decade before her death, in the late 1960s, Koshihara, himself a fish enthusiast and professionally the President of Nagoya Women’s College, addressed Japanese national radio NHK and talked about his beloved pet at length.

At that time, she weighed about 15 pounds (7.5 kilograms) with a length of 27 inches (70 centimeters).

With an orangish hue, she was a sight for sore eyes, and would often come swimming to the edge of the pond when her master called, “Hanako! Hanako!”

Although fish do not have external ears, they have inner linings which help them perceive sound vibrations, and she considered Koshihara’s voice as her ultimate love song.

A light pat on her head would further make her bob in extreme glee, one other factor which Koshihara believes added to her longevity. read further at http://www.hanakokoi.com/

where to buy koi fish art you need to know

koi art chinese koi art painting

famous koi fish artist

Two Carp fan painting by Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849)

Katsushika Hokusai was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and
printmaker of the Edo period.

Born in Edo, Hokusai is best known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji

koi art leaping carp
photo from katsushikahokusai.org

“Carp” (1884) by Chinese artist Qi Baishi

Qi Baishi was a Chinese painter, noted for the whimsical, often
playful style of his watercolor works.

Born to a peasant family from Xiangtan, Hunan, Qi became a carpenter at 14, and learned to paint by himself. Wikipedia

 

Oniwakamaru preparing to kill a giant carp”
by Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797-1861)

Biography written by

Author:
Dieter Wanczura of www.artelino.com

Kuniyoshi Utagawa was born in 1797 in Edo (died April 14, 1861). Information about the childhood of Kuniyoshi is a bit in the mist. His father was a silk-dyer and the given name of the boy was Yoshisaburo.

The young Yoshisaburo apparently developed a passion for drawing at a very early age.

At the age of 14, he joined the famous Utagawa school, then headed
by the great master ukiyo-e Toyokuni Utagawa (1769 – 1825). According to other sources, he had been trained by Katsukawa Shuntei before.

Toyokuni gave his talented student Yoshisaburo the name Kuniyoshi.

At that time it was the habit, that a student who had entered an art
school, received a new artist name that was connected to the master’s name.

The name was created from the ending kuni of Toyokuni and the
beginning of the boy’s name Yoshisaburo – thus we had Kuniyoshi Utagawa.

After having left the Utagawa School, Kuniyoshi had a tough time to make a living as an ukiyo-e artist. He was even forced to earn his living by repairing and selling floor-mats. learn more 

japanese koi art history

The history of the Japanese Koi fish is not commonly known to even the … from then on the fish became the subject of much Chinese artwork.

japanese koi paintings

Choose your favorite japanese koi paintings from our products of available designs. All japanese koi paintings Free shipping worldwide. Buy now here

https://youtu.be/VNUvpk740MY
koi art

Koi art Some of the most famous and recognizable Chinese and Japanese koi art artwork is that of the carp.

Most Asian art enthusiasts are familiar with koi fish paintings and
ukiyo-e woodblock prints, as well as the koi art artwork it has inspired around the world.

And most people have seen the famous nishikigoi (錦鯉), or koi fish in many kinds of pictures and koi art!

But did you know the history behind this koi art artwork?

Do you know that koi fish is important to the Chinese and Japanese people?

NOTE: The word ‘koi’ used in the West to describe the variety of carp the Japanese call ‘nishikigoi’.

In Japan, the word ‘koi’ means ‘carp’ in general and used for all the
different species of koi fish, particularly wild carp.

In this hub, I’ll use the term ‘koi’ to describe the koi fish and koi art
about it and carp for everything else under the sun.

 

Information about the Asian Carp

A carp is a type of freshwater fish that can found in most areas of the
world (except the Middle East, the poles, and eastern Europe.

There are some carp species around the world, and there are both
wild and domesticated versions of every species.

The common carp seen in the Chinese and Japanese
paintingsbelieved to have originated in China and brought to Japan
at some point.

There are some carp species and subspecies, and many of these can found in both China and Japan.

koi art

The nishikigoi carp, which is what most Westerners call ‘koi’ or ‘koi
fish’, is an ornamental variety of domesticated carp which was first bred in Ojiya,

Niigata Prefecture, Japan, in the 1820s. There are now many varieties of koi which have exported and bred around the world.

Chinese koi fish art

If you want to purchase this koi fish  painting click here

China is the ancestral home of carp art, and where koi and
traditional Japanese carp art (especially the early paintings) draws much of its inspiration.

To the Chinese people, the carp is a symbol of perseverance, strength, and endurance.

In many Chinese folktales, the carp considered an incarnation of
the dragon that brings happiness and wealth to those whose path it crosses.

Also, with its long whiskers and scales, the carp said to resemble a dragon.

https://youtu.be/n_NUhHNF2N0
This is the legend of the koi fish who turns into a dragonhttps://www.giobelkoicenter.com/koi-fish-transforming-into-a-dragon-2017/

In fact, one of the most popular Chinese carp motifs is a carp(s)
swimming toward a waterfall and transforming into a dragon.

This motif based on an ancient Chinese legend about carp who
swim upstream in the Yellow River toward the mythical Dragon’s
Gate at the top of a giant legendary mountain.

Those few carp who swim up the waterfall and through the gate changed into dragons.

To this day there exists a saying in China: “lǐ yú tiào lóng mén” (“鲤鱼跳龙门”), or “The carp has leaped through the dragon’s gate.

” This saying is often used for students who pass their university
exams, or people in general who work hard at a task and succeed beyond their wildest expectations.

Some other common carp motifs in Chinese art include yin yang
carp (with a black and red carp forming the two sides of the yin
yang symbol), carp swimming among lotus flowers (a sacred
Buddhist symbol that represents mental harmony), and a group of
nine carp (with nine considered a lucky number by the Chinese) swimming together.

The carp can found in many kinds of Chinese artwork, including
scroll paintings, ink paintings, ceramics, and more.

Japanese Koi Art koi fish painting

If you want to purchase this koi art koi fish painting click here 

Japan is the one country from where koi art has spread around the world.
Paintings and pictures of carp – in particular the koi carp – have
been made by artists and photographers in Japan and around the world.

In Japan, the carp represents good luck and good fortune. Also, the word ‘koi’ (鯉) pronounced the same as another word (‘恋’) meaning love and affection.

The Chinese legend of the Dragon’s Gate is also well-known in
Japan and the same motif of carp swimming up a waterfall is also common in Japan.

This motif can found in many the famous ukiyo-e woodblock prints.

Also to the carp swimming upstream, a carp swimming downstream can also found in Japanese art.

This carp said to have achieved its life goals while the one
swimming upstream and toward the Dragon’s Gate is still trying to make its dream come true.

Carp paintings made before the advent of ukiyo-e in the Edo
period showed a carp swimming in its natural environment in full color.

Many of these paintings were no doubt inspired by the Chinese carp paintings.

When ukiyo-e became popular, the carp became a popular subject
for the artists to depict in their prints.

Many of the ukiyo-e masters such as Katsushika Hokusai, Utagawa
Kuniyoshi, and Kitao Masayoshi depicted the carp in its gracefulness and glory.

Many Japanese carp paintings also have a strong Buddhist connotation.

Some carp swimming in the ocean are symbolic of people
swimming through the “ocean of suffering” as a fish swims in the sea. Others reflect the Zen quality of finding peace in the moment by observing the carp.

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Choose your favorite koi art koi fish paintings designs and buy
them as wall art, home decor

Thrill your walls now with a stunning Carp & Koi print from the world’s largest art gallery. Choose from thousands of Carp & Koi artworks

Koi, fish, Japanese art, design, linear art | See more ideas about Pisces, Japanese koi and Koi carp.

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Explore Giobelkoicenter board “Koi Art” on
Pinterest.paintings, great style of painting with great use of colour,
creative use of canvas to placement fish

The Koi fish in Japanese Mythology

Photo from http://artmight.comhttp://artmight.com/Country/Japanese/Kuniyoshi-The-Giant-Carp-50545p.html

The koi has appeared in some Japanese folktales and legends, and
some of these legends have depicted in koi fish painting.

Two ancient Japanese legends about koi fish that depicted in ukiyo-
e are the stories of the “golden boy” Kintarō wrestling the giant koi
fish and Oniwakamaru (the future Musashibo Benkei) finding and
killing at Bishimon Waterfall the giant carp that ate his mother.

Both depicted by ukiyo-e artists such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Tsukioka Yoshitoshi.

Gyotaku Fish Prints

https://youtu.be/InpLfs4rasw

One of the most unique forms of art to come out of Japan is the gyotaku fish print.

Gyotaku is a form of art where a live fish rubbed in ink and stamped on paper to make an art print.

It is one that has spread beyond Japan and across the world.

Gyotaku created by Japanese fishermen during the 1800s as a way
to record their catches and display them for the world to see.

After a while, regular people and artists began to catch on to this art form and it became popular.

Koi are one of the most popular species of fish used for this form of
art, but rubber fish are becoming more and more popular nowadays.

The movements of the fish captured on paper are what makes this art form so unique.

Modern-Day Koi Art digital painting

The popularity of koi art has exploded across the world in recent decades.

The orange and white koi that most Westerners know has depicted
in pictures, paintings, posters, computer screensavers, mousepads, and more.

Many of the designs of the koi paintings based on the ancient
Chinese and Japanese koi fish paintings, and others have created
using modern-day technology such as computer vector graphics
and digital photography or digital painting

Koi paintings and pictures are also very popular feng shui décor, and all-around nice pictures to look at! Since the koi is a very
beautiful, relaxing fish to look at and has much symbolism attached
to it, it’s only natural that it would be perfect for a feng shui-
oriented home environment or someone who wants a good picture to help them relax.

In China and Japan, koi fish and koi art are as common and popular
as in the West nowadays, but there are still artists who paint carp
paintings (both regular and koi carp paintings) in the classical way.

 

 

Digital koi fish painting koi art feng shui
digitall paint replica of original oil painting, printed on premium artist canvas.

Framed/stretched ready to hang. Gallery wrapped, sides painted.
Feng Shui koi fish painting koi art work used to bring Feng Shui
luck and fortune by harnessing the life energy of “Chi”, or the “Dragon’s Cosmic Breath”.

Chi brings good fortune to those who surrounded by it.
The koi fish brings luck and wealth.

Koi fish paintings represent harmony and balance. Feng Shui fish paintings are the element of Water and bring Feng Shui fortune. Koi paintings are for home and office Feng Shui décor.

koi fish tattoo koi art

koi art

Besides to koi art, koi (and regular carp) tattoo designs have become popular all around the world.

Many people get very elaborate and beautiful koi tattoo designs
that have all the traditional attributes of the carp, as well as personal
meaning for the person tattooed.

Some of the traditional designs of koi swimming amidst lotuses,
bleeding koi, koi swimming in water, and koi swimming upstream
or up a waterfall are some of the designs many people have chosen for their koi fish tattoo.

check out koi fish color meaning chart for the koi fish meaning colors

koi fish drawing

How to draw koi fish koi art from wedrawanimals.com

 

Step 1: Let’s draw a koi fish! Start by drawing a semi-circle for the head.

golden lotus flower symbolism in koi art chinese calligraphy painting

koi fish painting golden lotus flower chinese calligraphy painting

Lotus Flower & Koi Fish Feng Shui Painting: ????symbolize that
your get big benefits in business year after year.

(In China lotus sounds the same as the word “year (?)”. )

golden lotus flower symbolism

In Buddhist symbolism the lotus is symbolic of purity of the body,
speech, and mind as while rooted in the mud, its flowers blossom
on long stalks as if floating above the muddy waters of attachment and desire.

In Egyptian iconography, the sun bursts from the open blossom. It is the archetypal vulva.

In Hinduism as in Buddhism, the lotus is associated with the birth of divine beings. …

In Buddhism, the lotus represents purity because its flower rises
above the vase like the Enlightened One above the world.

You can buy this koi fish painting chinese calligraphy painting with goldend lotus flower here 

Chinese Traditional Painting

koi art chinese calligraphy step by step koi fish painting

sources www.artofsilk.com

Chinese traditional painting is often known as Chinese ink and
wash painting (水墨画) because of the materials and technique used.

Traditionally, only black and white were used, but over time artists
added red, orange, green and other colors.

Because of the simplicity of their form and elegance on paper, koi
became a popular subject for this style of painting.

There are seven essential steps to painting a koi in the ink-and-wash style.

First, the body is painted, then the tail is added.

The third step is to paint the head, the mouth and the eyes.

The next step is to paint the scales on the body of the fish.

The fifth step is to add the fins, followed by the painting of the spine and other details of the koi. learn more here

japanese koi art

 

The cultivation of koi for decorative use originated in Japan, so it is
in the Japanese artistic tradition that we see the most variety in koi depictions.

In the Japanese language, the word “koi” is a homophone for
another word that means “affection” or “love”; therefore the fish
itself has come to represent these concepts.

It is regarded as the “divine fish”, associated with heavenly matters
and spreading happiness and prosperity wherever it swims.

Because of their rich and varied coloration, koi are known as “living
jewels” and are used to enhance a variety of household, religious
and purely artistic ornaments.

Koi flags

In Japanese mythology, koi are often associated with children, who
are much celebrated and beloved.

As a result, parents and grandparents hang colorful flags that
resemble koi outside their homes to attract blessions for the younger generation.

This tradition is traditionally associated with Boy’s Day (Tango no
Sekku) a Japanese holiday venerating the place of children in society .

Koi are thought of as symbols for male virility and strength, so it is
natural that they serve as a representation for the qualities most sought in boys.

It is said that if a koi is caught, it will lie still beneath the knife,
facing its death bravely like a brave Samurai facing a sword. Parents hope their sons will face their destinies with equal stoicism.